Presentation Title

The Effectiveness of Library Instruction for Graduate/Professional Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Location

PARB 127

Type of Presentation

Individual paper/presentation (20 minute presentation)

Target Audience

Higher Education

Abstract

Library instruction to improve information literacy (IL) is often considered essential only for undergraduates. However, students in graduate/professional programs do not always have the requisite skills needed for graduate level study and research, which suggests they may also benefit from library instruction targeted specifically to graduate students. This study used a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness of library instruction for increasing IL skills and/or knowledge among graduate and professional students. The authors searched seven databases to identify studies published in English between 2000 and 2019 that reported on library instruction for graduate or professional students, and objectively measured change in IL knowledge and/or skills. Sixteen studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the systematic review; 12 of the 16 included sufficient information to be included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed the overall effect of library instruction was significant with graduate/professional students scoring slightly more than one standard deviation higher on a measure of IL skills after instruction. Subgroup analysis showed no statistically significant moderation in effect by format of instruction; however, there was a significant moderation when comparing the two broad disciplines of health science and non-health science students. To strengthen the accuracy of future meta-analyses, there is a need for larger numbers of studies that measure the impact of library instruction, particularly instruction provided in an online or hybrid format. There is also a need for more precise description of instructional sessions as well as more robust data reporting by authors of primary studies.

Presentation Description

Library instruction to improve information literacy (IL) is often considered essential only for undergraduates. However, students in graduate/professional programs do not always have the requisite skills needed for graduate level study and research, which suggests they may also benefit from library instruction. This study used a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness of library instruction for increasing IL skills/knowledge among graduate and professional students. Findings indicate the overall effect of library instruction was positive and significant.

Keywords

Academic libraries, Information Literacy, Graduate students, Library instruction

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Feb 21st, 10:00 AM Feb 21st, 11:15 AM

The Effectiveness of Library Instruction for Graduate/Professional Students: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

PARB 127

Library instruction to improve information literacy (IL) is often considered essential only for undergraduates. However, students in graduate/professional programs do not always have the requisite skills needed for graduate level study and research, which suggests they may also benefit from library instruction targeted specifically to graduate students. This study used a systematic review and meta-analysis to assess the effectiveness of library instruction for increasing IL skills and/or knowledge among graduate and professional students. The authors searched seven databases to identify studies published in English between 2000 and 2019 that reported on library instruction for graduate or professional students, and objectively measured change in IL knowledge and/or skills. Sixteen studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in the systematic review; 12 of the 16 included sufficient information to be included in the meta-analysis. Meta-analysis showed the overall effect of library instruction was significant with graduate/professional students scoring slightly more than one standard deviation higher on a measure of IL skills after instruction. Subgroup analysis showed no statistically significant moderation in effect by format of instruction; however, there was a significant moderation when comparing the two broad disciplines of health science and non-health science students. To strengthen the accuracy of future meta-analyses, there is a need for larger numbers of studies that measure the impact of library instruction, particularly instruction provided in an online or hybrid format. There is also a need for more precise description of instructional sessions as well as more robust data reporting by authors of primary studies.