Term of Award

2004

Degree Name

Master of Science in Kinesiology with an Emphasis in Sport Psychology

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis (restricted to Georgia Southern)

Department

Department of Public Health

Committee Chair

Kevin L. Burke

Committee Member 1

Charles J. Hardy

Committee Member 2

A. Barry Joyner

Abstract

This study examined relationships between batting performance, trait anxiety, and concentration style. A predictive analysis was also formed to determine the combination of subscales that may best explain variance in batting performance. To accurately measure these variables, the Sport Competition Anxiety Test (SCAT; Martens, Vealey, & Burton, 1990) and the Batting-specific Test of Attentional and Interpersonal Style (B-TAIS; Albrecht & Feltz, 1987) were employed. Participants consisted of both male collegiate baseball and female collegiate sofitball players located in the southeastern section of the United States. Participants' 2003 batting statistics were utilized to assess batting performance, and participants must have compiled at least 40 or more at-bats during the 2003 season to participate in the study. To calculate overall batting performance the OPS (on-base percentage plus slugging percentage) batting statistic was utilized. Results displayed no significant relationships between OPS and B-TAIS subscales among collegiate baseball participants. Also, no subscales explained variance in OPS. Significant relationships were found between collegiate softball, OPS, and B-TAISsubscales, and 17.3% (SE = .164) of the variance in OPS was explained by subscales INFP and RED. INFP was the best predictor of OPS (beta = .365). Sport competition anxiety was negatively associated with OPS for both baseball and softball participants. There were no significant correlational differences between OPS and B-TAIS subscales for gender.

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