Term of Award

Spring 2010

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Charles A. Reavis

Committee Member 1

Barbara J. Mallory

Committee Member 2

Linda M. Arthur

Abstract

The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the impact of the school climate components of teacher job satisfaction, morale, and efficacy on student achievement. This qualitative study utilized semi-structured interviews of both principals and teachers, reviewed information pertaining to the school district's Southern Association of Colleges and Schools accreditation, and from the School Matters website pertaining to one school that made Adequate Yearly Progress, and one that did not make Adequate Yearly Progress. The sample of eight teachers was selected using a purposive sampling and the accounts of their personal ideas, feelings, beliefs, and perceptions of their feelings of job satisfaction, morale, and efficacy were presented through direct quotes to provide richness in detailing their real world descriptions. The principals at both elementary schools were also interviewed to determine their feelings about the climate within their respective buildings. Teachers at the both schools indicated that their personal feelings did not influence their professional obligations; however, in the school that did not make Adequate Yearly Progress, the teachers indicated that they wanted to be respected by their principal; therefore, in this study, it appears that feelings of job satisfaction can impact a school's potential to make Adequate Yearly Progress. Findings revealed that teacher morale has the potential to impact a school's ability to make Adequate Yearly Progress because in the school that made Adequate Yearly Progress, there was a sense of trust, confidence, and enthusiasm that existed among its teachers, whereas, in the school that did not make Adequate Yearly Progress, this type of atmosphere was not fully operational. Teacher efficacy did not appear to have an impact on a school's potential to make Adequate Yearly Progress because teachers at both schools were confident about their ability to successfully teach their students. School principals and those aspiring to be building level supervisors, may wish to explore the findings of this research to address components of school climate. This information can enable them to foster an environment that is conducive for student learning. Teachers are a valuable asset to the educational profession which includes helping students and building level administrators achieve success.

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