Term of Award

Spring 2007

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Walter S. Polka

Committee Member 1

Cordelia Zinskie

Committee Member 2

Mary Ann Sullivan

Abstract

The purpose of this researchers study was to analyze the use of capacity building strategies in non-profit speech and hearing centers by examining the chief executive officers' (CEOs') perceptions of both actual and desired use of capacity building strategies in their organizations. A survey was sent to the 39 CEOs of non-profit speech and hearing centers who are member agencies of the National Association of Speech and Hearing Centers (NASHC). NASHC is a consortium of free standing, non-profit speech and hearing centers from around the United States. The survey consisted of a five point rating scale (1 = rarely done, 5 = done to a very high degree) with 43 capacity building statements to determine the degree of actual and desired use, five open-ended questions, and demographic information. Five components of capacity building were assessed by the survey: vision and mission, leadership, resources, outcomes, and products and services. Thirty-four surveys were returned of the 39 sent for a response rate of 85%. Using quantitative methods, a dependent t test was calculated to compare the means of actual and desired use of capacity building strategies for each item and for each component area. Results were statistically significant (p < .01) for all statements and for each component area. The results indicated that although CEOs perceived their 2 organizations as actively engaged in capacity building, it was not to the degree desired. Some statements were noted to have larger gaps between actual and desired use than others. These statements concerned issues dealing with strategic planning, board self-appraisal, succession planning, long-term fund development, information technology, paid advertising, and outcome effectiveness. Open-ended questions elicited responses as to the perceived reason for the gap between actual and desired use. The common theme noted was lack of resources; particularly time, money, and personnel. The information obtained from this study can help CEOs of non-profit speech and hearing centers recognize their level of engagement in capacity building, evaluate perceived gaps between actual and desired use, and hopefully seek ways to achieve the degree of capacity building they desire in their organizations.

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