Term of Award

2006

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Michael D. Richardson

Committee Member 1

NA

Committee Member 2

NA

Committee Member 3

NA

Abstract

The quantitative research project examined the Georgia superintendents' assessment of their use of the six crucial C's in their job performance. The research method used for the study was a qualitative analysis of data collected from eight interviews of Georgia superintendents under contract during the 2005-2006 school year. Results of the study were used to address the three research questions: (1) extent to which the Georgia superintendents assess their use of the six crucial C's, (2) extent to which Georgia superintendents share the importance of the six crucial C's, and (3) extent to which Georgia superintendents rate their use of the six crucial C's in their job performance. This study also included a review of the literature that focused upon curricular choice, child advocacy, community building, collaboration, communication, and connection, with some inclusion of literature on educational reformation and the superintendency. Findings about how the superintendents assessed the six crucial C's in their Georgia school district included descriptive information about the six crucial C's, superintendents' perceptions of the six crucial C's, and demographic information about the Georgia superintendents and their school district. Both similarities and differences were found in how the superintendents are utilizing the six crucial C's in their school districts. The study showed that the six crucial C's were being implemented with varying degrees of success and with varying degrees of skills in the concepts. Superintendents' perceptions of the six crucial C's were obtained through a variety of questions asked by the researcher conducting the interviews. Comments made by respondents to the interview questions provided in-depth information on the perception of the superintendents about the six crucial C's. Superintendents most strongly agreed that the six crucial C's were important concepts used to help them in their job performance. The superintendents did not share the combinations or the extents used of the six crucial C's that were most important. The wide variety of information attained from the interviewees can be used to train present and future superintendents about the six crucial C's in the Georgia school districts.

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