Term of Award

Fall 2007

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Walter S. Polka

Committee Member 1

Barbara J. Mallory

Committee Member 2

Charles Reavis

Abstract

This mixed research study explored the perceived change leader behaviors of 18 GLISI-trained principals and 71 observers. This study also determined whether differences existed between the perceptions of 18 GLISI-trained principals and 5 non- GLISI-trained principals regarding their change leader behaviors on five domains of Kouzes and Posners (2003) LPI survey. Two 30-item surveys were used in this study: LPI-Self and LPI-Observer. These surveys were completed by 23 principals and 71 observers. In addition, seven open-ended questions were answered by GLISI-trained principals. Qualitative analysis involved indepth interviews with five GLISI-trained principals. Research Question One revealed significant differences between GLISI-trained principals and observers on all five domains of Kouzes and Posners variables. The differences between GLISI-trained principals and non-GLISI-trained principals were significant for Challenge the Process and Encourage the Heart; that is, both groups agreed that these two leadership domains were commonly used. Research Question Two revealed significant differences between the perceptions of GLISI-trained and non- GLISI-trained principals on three domains: Model the Way, Inspire a Shared Vision, and Enable Others to Act. No significant differences were found for Challenge the Process and Encourage the Heart. In terms of what leadership behaviors were perceived to be most important in influencing GLISI-trained principals and non-GLISI-trained principals to lead school-based improvement, Model the Way, Inspire a Shared Vision, and Enable the Act were most influential. Research Question Three revealed value-added aspects of GLISI training and the principals personal change leadership behaviors. The value-added aspects of GLISI training benefited GLISI-trained principals in the following emerging themes: cohorts and building relationships; student achievement and school improvement; long-term strategic planning; and hands on experiences with relevant best practices; risk taking; and listening and sharing ideas with other principals and leaders. Overall, data collected on the perceptions of GLISI-trained principals and observers revealed more differences than similarities for principals than observers. Selfratings of GLISI-trained principals were slightly higher than observers. Conclusions for perceptions of GLISI-trained principals and non-GLISI-trained principals revealed more similarities than differences. GLISI-trained principals perceived themselves as using practices and behaviors that both GLISI and non-GLISI-trained principals rated as important.

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