Term of Award

Spring 2012

Degree Name

Master of Science in Kinesiology (M.S.)

Document Type and Release Option

Thesis (open access)

Department

Department of Health and Kinesiology

Committee Chair

Amy Jo Riggs

Committee Member 1

Jim McMillan

Committee Member 2

Stephen Rossi

Committee Member 3

Barry Joyner

Abstract

The purpose of the current study was to examine the effect of a branched- chain amino acid (BCAA) supplement with and without carbohydrate (CHO) on performance in competitive cyclists. Subjects were recruited from the GSU cycling team (n=6). Each subject's maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) was determined on an electrically braked cycle ergometer using a graded exercise test. In a randomized, double-blind, crossover design, subjects received one of three supplements prior to exercise: BCAA-1 teaspoon BCAA powder (Optimum Nutrition ® Instantized BCAA 5000mg Powder containing 2.5g leucine, 1.25g isoleucine, and 1.25g valine), mixed with 500 ml of a zero calorie sports drink (Powerade Ion 4 ZERO ®- Orange, containing potassium, sodium, and vitamins B12, B3, and B6); Carbohydrate + BCAA (CHO +BCAA)- 1 teaspoon BCAA powder (containing 2.5g leucine, 1.25g isoleucine, and 1.25g valine), mixed with 500ml a 6% CHO sports drink (Powerade Ion 4 ®- Orange, containing glucose, potassium, sodium, and vitamins B12, B3, and B6); and Placebo (PL): 500ml of a zero calorie sports drink (Powerade Ion 4 ZERO ®- Orange, containing potassium, sodium, and vitamins B12, B3, and B6). Ten minutes following ingestion, subjects performed a time cycle to exhaustion at 80% of their previously determined VO2 max, during which heart rate was recorded continuously and ratings of perceived exertion were measured every 3 minutes using the validated Borg 1-10 RPE scale. It was hypothesized that 1.) Subjects receiving CHO + BCAA would significantly improve time to exhaustion when compared to BCAA and placebo, and 2.) Subjects receiving CHO + BCAA would demonstrate significantly lower average RPE scores during exercise when compared to BCAA and placebo. Contrary to the hypotheses, the results revealed that cycling time to exhaustion was not significantly different between trials, F(2,10) = .224, p > 0.05. Average ratings of perceived exertion were also not significantly different between trials, F(2,10) = 4.026, p = 0.052.

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