Presentation Title

Using Graphic Novels for Middle Grade Students to Develop Critical Thinking for Analyzing Propaganda Devices

Presenter Information

Paulette Harris, AGFollow

Biographical Sketch

  • Founder/Director Augusta University Literacy Center
  • Former Middle Grades Teacher
  • Assistant Principal

Type of Presentation

Panel submission

Brief Description of Presentation

Middle grade students find graphic novels to be very appealing reading. Middle grade teachers may use graphic novels to stimulate their students' critical thinking skills. Tied directly to critical thinking skills, one finds in the research identifying and analyzing propaganda devices. Such propaganda devices include the following six techniques: card-stacking, glittering generalities, plain folks, testimonials, bandwagon, and name-calling. Research indicates that students listen, speak, read, and write more effectively with the use of graphic novels.

Abstract of Proposal

In the 21st century, students in grades 6-8 are more frequently exposed to subliminal messaging using certain propaganda techniques. Propaganda is defined as intentionally using information to further one's cause, conviction, or position, or tarnish that of another. Such propaganda techniques include card-stacking, glittering generalities, plain folks, testimonials, bandwagon, and name-calling. For example, the technique of "card-stacking" may be used in a graphic novel to slant a message from the author using words such as "commie," "fascist," etc.

Politically themed graphic novels depict many of the devices mentioned as propaganda techniques. Titles of graphic novels appropriate for middle graders that are politically themed and contain propaganda devices include "A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds," "The Complete Persepolis," "V for Vendetta," and "Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea" and many others. Certain authors provide graphic novels as essential tools for recognizing propaganda devices. An example of such an author is Lina Sun. In her research, Sun indicates that graphic novels are perfect sources for integrating propaganda recognition. She is conducting a study in Beijing, China that focuses on just this topic. Middle grade English Language Learners are the perfect audience for graphic novels that incorporate propaganda devices. Approaches to implementing media literacy education with adolescents using critical questions is one of the best routes to help them recognize subliminal messaging used in advertisements and propaganda techniques. Learning to read advertising critically supports the need for the middle grade reader's heightened awareness during the message interpretation process. Thus, the reader taking an active stance in reading graphic novels and other sources is essential to the purpose of developing students' analytical and critical thinking, which also support overall language learning.

Location

Session 4D (Habersham, Hilton Garden Inn)

Start Date

2-23-2019 8:30 AM

End Date

2-23-2019 10:00 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 23rd, 8:30 AM Feb 23rd, 10:00 AM

Using Graphic Novels for Middle Grade Students to Develop Critical Thinking for Analyzing Propaganda Devices

Session 4D (Habersham, Hilton Garden Inn)

In the 21st century, students in grades 6-8 are more frequently exposed to subliminal messaging using certain propaganda techniques. Propaganda is defined as intentionally using information to further one's cause, conviction, or position, or tarnish that of another. Such propaganda techniques include card-stacking, glittering generalities, plain folks, testimonials, bandwagon, and name-calling. For example, the technique of "card-stacking" may be used in a graphic novel to slant a message from the author using words such as "commie," "fascist," etc.

Politically themed graphic novels depict many of the devices mentioned as propaganda techniques. Titles of graphic novels appropriate for middle graders that are politically themed and contain propaganda devices include "A Survivor's Tale: My Father Bleeds," "The Complete Persepolis," "V for Vendetta," and "Pyongyang: A Journey in North Korea" and many others. Certain authors provide graphic novels as essential tools for recognizing propaganda devices. An example of such an author is Lina Sun. In her research, Sun indicates that graphic novels are perfect sources for integrating propaganda recognition. She is conducting a study in Beijing, China that focuses on just this topic. Middle grade English Language Learners are the perfect audience for graphic novels that incorporate propaganda devices. Approaches to implementing media literacy education with adolescents using critical questions is one of the best routes to help them recognize subliminal messaging used in advertisements and propaganda techniques. Learning to read advertising critically supports the need for the middle grade reader's heightened awareness during the message interpretation process. Thus, the reader taking an active stance in reading graphic novels and other sources is essential to the purpose of developing students' analytical and critical thinking, which also support overall language learning.