Title

Defining Death Through Individual-Level Determinants

Document Type

Contribution to Book

Publication Date

2020

Publication Title

Finding Dignity at the End of Life: A Spiritual Reflection on Palliative Care

Abstract

This chapter serves as an introduction to the reader, highlighting the common thread among all individuals – despite their rooted or inherited belief system – that throughout disease, there is a universal need to find purpose and peace as a component of comfort, alluding to treatment. Patient beliefs must be understood to reflect and offer soul-seeking peace. A social ecological model is utilized to contextualize the theoretical framework of various reflections on palliative care. This model is based on work by theorists including Urie Bronfenbrenner and McLeroy, Bibeau, Steckler, and Glanz (1988), all of whom propose that behavior is shaped due to multiple levels of influence. There are five major levels of influence: intrapersonal, interpersonal, institutional, community, and public policy. As clinicians and healthcare givers walking with patients, the patient’s community, their organizational background, and their interpersonal beliefs must be at least basically understood to reflect and offer soul-seeking peace.

Comments

Georgia Southern University faculty member Sara Plospohl co-authored “Defining Death Through Individual-Level Determinants ” in the publication Finding Dignity at the End of Life A Spiritual Reflection on Palliative Care.

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