Title

Keynote Presentation “Learning from Those We Were Taught to Look Down on”

Conference Strand

Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy

Abstract

Judging ourselves relative to others is a natural consequence of being graded in school and judged in families. Neither schools nor families encourage us to question the grading systems, so it is on us if we want to develop more mature systems of evaluation. To widen our modes of judgment, we can learn from our own experiences or listening from others, or, more importantly, we can learn from those we were taught to look down on, which entails the emotional and professional work that leads us towards justice in cross-cultural counseling and all other fields. Regardless of our backgrounds, learning from those we were taught to look down on widens awareness, and at this time in history, it is particularly useful for grasping and working against the systems of injustice in American life that the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed.

Description

See Abstract

Evidence

Invited Speaker- not applicable

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

From

https://www.wcwonline.org/Active-Researchers/peggy-mcintosh-phd

Peggy McIntosh, Ph.D., former associate director of the Wellesley Centers for Women (WCW), is founder of the National SEED Project (Seeking Educational Equity and Diversity). The Project helps teachers and community members to create their own local, year-long, peer-led seminars. The participants in these seminars use their own experiences and those of their students, children, and colleagues in important conversations that in turn create communities and workplaces that are more inclusive.

McIntosh is widely known for her 1988 and 1989 papers on privilege -- White Privilege and Male Privilege: A Personal Account of Coming to See Correspondences through Work on Women’s Studies and White Privilege: Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack. Although the term ‘White Privilege’ was used well before McIntosh’s work, it gained widespread use following the publication of these papers. Her four-part paper series on Feeling Like A Fraud, written over thirty years, also continues to empower readers to draw wisdom from their own life experiences.

Location

Virtual Conference

Start Date

2-11-2021 8:45 AM

End Date

2-11-2021 10:15 AM

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Feb 11th, 8:45 AM Feb 11th, 10:15 AM

Keynote Presentation “Learning from Those We Were Taught to Look Down on”

Virtual Conference

Judging ourselves relative to others is a natural consequence of being graded in school and judged in families. Neither schools nor families encourage us to question the grading systems, so it is on us if we want to develop more mature systems of evaluation. To widen our modes of judgment, we can learn from our own experiences or listening from others, or, more importantly, we can learn from those we were taught to look down on, which entails the emotional and professional work that leads us towards justice in cross-cultural counseling and all other fields. Regardless of our backgrounds, learning from those we were taught to look down on widens awareness, and at this time in history, it is particularly useful for grasping and working against the systems of injustice in American life that the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed.