Title

Power and Privilege: A Pedagogical Approach for Multicultural Counseling without Perpetuating Stereotypes

Conference Strand

Teaching, Training, and Supervision

Abstract

This presentation explores the use of a systems-based pedagogical approach and creative methodologies for teaching multicultural counseling course. As current diversity pedagogy can unintentionally perpetuate stereotypes, this pedagogical method examines social systems, power differentials, and intersectionality to provide a holistic approach to multicultural counseling courses. Current literature, assignment ideas, and best practices will be provided through discussion and activities.

Description

While social justice & multiculturalism is at the core of the counseling profession, pedagogical methods for increasing multicultural competence continues to present challenges (Chan, Cor, & Band, 2018). This includes the unintended perpetuation of stereotypes when teaching multicultural counseling courses.To combat this phenomenon, there is growing literature supporting the use of other pedagogical methodologies to enhance students’ multicultural competence. Additionally, research shows that students of color tend to be dissatisfied with the breadth & depth of multicultural courses (Seward, 2014). The depth & breadth of this content can be enhanced through education regarding social systems, historical occurrences, societal perceptions, intersectionality, power, & privilege. Using a systems approach to strengthen students’ understanding of these nuanced aspects of multiculturalism increases students’ multicultural sensitivity & awareness by encouraging self-exploration (Torino, 2015). Additionally, students’ exposure to diverse groups may be limited, thereby limiting their empathy towards & understanding of the experiences of those of other cultures (Shen, 2015). The use of movies to demonstrate societal injustices has been shown useful in increasing students’ interests and desires to enhance their multicultural competencies, as well as offers students an opportunity to observe the experiences of others (Shen, 2015). As advocacy is also part of our duty as counseling professionals (ACA, 2014), it is important that students are aware of their privilege & how to use said privilege to advocate for others. This presentation will suggest a framework for a systems-based pedagogical method for teaching diversity issues in counseling to better prepare counselors in training for clinical work, teaching, research, supervision, & advocacy. Attendees will learn the basis for this systems-based approach, as well as best practices. This will also include activities & assignments that can be used in multicultural counseling courses & other courses wishing to infuse more multiculturalism. Attendees will also learn about the current literature in support of this pedagogical method.

Evidence

American Counseling Association. (2014). ACA code of ethics. Alexandria, VA: Author.

Chan, C. D., Cor, D. N., & Band, M. P. (2018). Privilege and oppression in counselor education: An intersectionality framework. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 46, 58-73.

Greene, J. H., Barden, S. M., Richardson, E. D., & Hall, K. G. (2014). The influence of film and experiential pedagogy on multicultural counseling self-efficacy and multicultural counseling competence. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 14(5), 63-78. doi:10.14434/josotlv14i5.12656

Guth, L. J., Pollard, B. L., Nitza, A., Puig, A., Chan, C. D., Singh, A. A., & Bailey, H. (2019). Ten strategies to intentionally use group work to transform hate, facilitate courageous conversations, and enhance community building. The Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 44(1).

Kasardo, A. E. (2019). Size as a diversity absent from multicultural textbooks. Women and Therapy, 42, 181-190.

Kerl. S. B. (2002). Using narrative approaches to teach multicultural counseling. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 30, 135-143.

Motulsky, S. L., Gere, S. H., Saleem, R., & Trantham, S. M. (2014). Teaching social justice in counseling psychology. The Counseling Psychologist, 42(8), 1058-1083.

Paone, T. R., Malott, K. M., Barr, J. J. (2015). Assessing the impact of a race-based course on counseling students: A quantitative study. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 43, 206-220.

Peters, H. C. (2017). Multicultural complexity: An intersectional lens for clinical supervision. International Journal of Advanced Counselling, 39, 176-187. doi:10.1007/s10447-017-9290-2

Semper, J. V. O., & Blasco, M. (2018). Revealing the hidden curriculum in higher education. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 37, 481-498.

Seward, D. X. (2014). Multicultural course pedagogy: Experiences of master’s-level students of color. Counselor Education and Supervision, 53, 62-79.

Shen, Y. (2015). Cultivating multiculturally competent counselors through movies. Journal of Creativity in Mental Health, 10, 232-246. doi:10.1080/15401383.2014.959679

Smith, L., Velez, B., Chambers, C., & Baranowski, K. (2019). Economic disadvantage at the intersections: Contemporary stereotypes in the headlines. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 47, 190-206.

Torino, G. C. (2015). Examining biases and white privilege: Classroom teaching strategies that promote cultural competence. Women & Therapy, 38, 295-307. doi:10.1080/02703149.2015.1059213

Washington, A. R., & Henfield, M. S. (2019). What do the AMCD multicultural and social justice counseling competencies mean in the context of Black Lives Matter?. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 47, 148-160.

Zeleke, W. A., Karayigit, C., & Myers-Brooks, K. (2018). Using self-regulated learning strategies to develop students’ multicultural counseling competency. Journal of Multicultural Counseling and Development, 46, 40-57.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Bianca Augustine, M.A., CCTP, Resident in Counseling, is a doctoral student in Counselor Education and Supervision at Old Dominion University in Virginia, where she is also a graduate teaching and research assistant. Her clinical and research experience and interests include trauma, suicidology, grief, and counseling issues unique to ethnic minorities and those with affectional and gender-expansive identities. She has worked with diverse populations of clients, presenting with a variety of concerns. She is also currently working towards her registered play therapy credentials.

Jordan Pearce, M.A. is a second-year doctoral student in counselor education and supervision at Old Dominion University. His background includes work as a crisis counselor and in intimate partner violence intervention, advocacy, and education. His research interests include increasing access to mental health services for marginalized populations, counseling within the LGBTQ community, and social justice issues in counseling.

Location

Session Six Breakouts: Embassy Suites Salon C

Start Date

2-8-2020 11:45 AM

End Date

2-8-2020 1:00 PM

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Feb 8th, 11:45 AM Feb 8th, 1:00 PM

Power and Privilege: A Pedagogical Approach for Multicultural Counseling without Perpetuating Stereotypes

Session Six Breakouts: Embassy Suites Salon C

This presentation explores the use of a systems-based pedagogical approach and creative methodologies for teaching multicultural counseling course. As current diversity pedagogy can unintentionally perpetuate stereotypes, this pedagogical method examines social systems, power differentials, and intersectionality to provide a holistic approach to multicultural counseling courses. Current literature, assignment ideas, and best practices will be provided through discussion and activities.