Title

Whose Rights? The Men's Rights Movement and Implications for Counselors

Conference Strand

Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy

Abstract

The men’s rights movement (MRM) is a social and political movement to dismantle feminism. Emerging from men’s activist movements of the 1970s, the contemporary MRM utilizes the language of social justice and equality to argue for political and legal actions impacting client well-being and access. This presentation explores the history and ideology of the MRM and the implications for counselors.

Description

This presentation is intended to problematize the current language used within the men’s rights movement to portray the movement as a grassroots or anti-establishment initiative and to justify antifeminist agendas. This session provides not only an introduction to the scholarship around the men’s rights movement but also offers examples and analysis of the men’s rights movement’s social and mass media presence. Next, the presentation highlights ways in which the men’s rights movement coopts the rhetoric of social justice and equality to increase legitimacy in the public consciousness. The result of this legitimization is the increase in antifeminist and antiequality political and legal actions. Counselors in the current political climate will encounter individuals on both sides of the men’s rights movement and must be able to advocate appropriately without compromising the ethical standards of the profession. Counselors should be able to critically evaluate the men’s rights movement rhetoric and have strategies to challenge this rhetoric and educate clients and students on the issue.

This presentation meets the following objectives:

Participants will be able to summarize the extant scholarship on the men’s rights movement, including the origins of the movement and current trends.

Participants will be able to identify men’s rights movement themes in current social and mass media.

Participants will be able to distinguish the ways the men’s rights movement uses the vocabulary of feminism and social justice to legitimize the positions of the movement.

Participants will brainstorm on ethical implications for working with individuals who are members of the movement and those who feel victimized by the movement.

Participants will obtain three strategies that may be used as individual or group interventions for clients or students related to developing a critical understanding of the men’s rights movement.

Evidence

Ametrano, I. M. (2014), Teaching ethical decision making: Helping students reconcile personal and professional values. Journal of Counseling & Development, 92, 154–161. doi:10.1002/j.1556-6676.2014.00143.x

Bonnett, A. (1996). The new primitives: Identity, landscape and cultural appropriation in the mythopoetic men's movement. Antipode, 28, 273-291.

Brady-Amoon, P., Makhija, N, Dixit, V., Dator, J. (2012). Social justice: Pushing past boundaries in graduate training. Journal for social action in counseling and psychology, 4 (2), 85-98.

Carrigan, T., Connell, B., & Lee, J. (1985). Toward a new sociology of masculinity. Theory and Society, 14, 551-604.

Chowdhury, R. (2014). Conditions of emergence: The formation of men's rights groups in contemporary India. Indian Journal of Gender Studies, 21, 27-53. doi: 10.1177/0971521513511199

Coston, B. M., & Kimmel, M. (2013). White men as the new victims: Reverse discrimination cases and the men's rights movement. Nevada Law Journal, 13, 368-385. Retrieved from http://scholars.law.unlv.edu/nlj/vol13/iss2/5

Crowley, J. E. (2009). Conflicted membership: Women in fathers' rights groups. Sociological Inquiry, 79, 328-350. doi: 10.1111/j.1475-682X.2009.00293.x

Fox, J. (2004). How men's movement participants view each other. The Journal of Men's Studies, 12, 103-118.

Girard, A. (2009). Backlash or equality? The influence of men's and women's rights discourses on domestic violence legislation in Ontario. Violence Against Women, 15, 5-23. doi: 10.1177/1077801208328344

Goode, W. J. (1982). Why men resist. In B. Thorne & M. Yalom (Eds.), Rethinking the family: Some feminist questions (pp. 131-150). New York: Longman.

Kaplan, D. M., Tarvydas, V. M., & Gladding, S. T. (2014). 20/20: A vision for the future of counseling: The new consensus definition of counseling. Journal of Counseling & Development, 92, 366-372. doi: 10.1002/j.1556-6676.2014.00164.x

Kaufman, M. (1999). Men, feminism, and men's contradictory experiences of power. In J. A.

Kuyper (Ed.), Men and Power (59-83). Halifax: Fernwood Books.

Khader, S. J. (2008). When equality justifies women's subjection: Luce Irigaray's critique of equality and the father's rights movement. Hypatia, 23 (4), 48-74.

Mann, R. M. (2008). Men's rights and feminist advocacy in Canadian domestic violence policy arenas: Contexts, dynamics, and outcomes of antifeminist backlash. Feminist Criminology, 3, 44-75. doi: 10.1177/1557085107311067

Messner, M. A. (1998). The limits of "the male sex role:" An analysis of the men's liberation and men's rights movements' discourse. Gender & Society, 12, 255-276.

Pease, B. (2002). Reconstructing men's interests. Men and Masculinities, 5, 165-177. doi: 10.1177/109718402236747

Ratts, M. J., Sing, A. A., Nassar-McMillan, S., Butler, S. K., & McCullough, J. R. (2016). Multicultural and social justice counseling competencies: Guidelines for the counseling profession. Multicultural Counseling and Development, 44, 28-48. doi: 10.1002/jmcd.12035

Rosen, L. N., Dragiewicz, M., & Gibbs, J. C. (2009). Fathers' rights groups: Demographic correlates and impact on custody policy. Violence Against Women, 15, 513-531. doi: 10.1177/1077801209331409

Salter, M. (2016). Men's rights or men's needs? Anti-feminism in Australian men's health promotion. Canadian Journal of Women and the Law, 28, 69-90. doi: 10.3138/cjwl.28.1.69

Sells, J. N., & Hagedorn, B. W. (2016). CACREP accreditation, ethics, and the affirmation of both religious and sexual identities: A response to Smith and Okech. Journal of Counseling & Development, 94, 265–279. doi:10.1002/jcad.12083

Smith, L. C., & Okech, J. E. A. (2016). Ethical issues raised by CACREP accreditation of programs within institutions that disaffirm or disallow diverse sexual orientations. Journal of Counseling & Development, 94, 252–264. doi:10.1002/jcad.12082

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Quentin Hunter, MEd, LPCA (KY), NCC, is a doctoral candidate in counselor education and supervision at the University of Louisville. He provides counseling services at a University of Louisville-sponsored community clinic in West Louisville and at a Louisville-area school. Quentin also teaches courses in tests and measurement and learning theories, and his research interests include research methods, multicultural counseling, school counseling, and counselor identity.

Katelyn Gosnell Richey, MEd, LPCA (KY) is school counselor in a rural Indiana school and a doctoral candidate in counselor education and supervision at the University of Louisville. Katelyn's counseling experiences include community and school-based counseling services in Kentucky and Indiana. Her research interests include antiracist school counseling, multicultural counseling, and qualitative research methods

Shaun Sowell, MEd, is certified in school counseling in the states of Kentucky and Alaska. She currently serves as a senior academic counselor at the University of Louisville where she is also pursuing a PhD in counselor education and supervision. She has experience counseling in elementary and high school levels, and her research interests include school counselor preparation, forgiveness and reconciliation, and the effects of poverty in school counseling.

Start Date

2-10-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

2-10-2018 11:30 AM

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Feb 10th, 10:15 AM Feb 10th, 11:30 AM

Whose Rights? The Men's Rights Movement and Implications for Counselors

The men’s rights movement (MRM) is a social and political movement to dismantle feminism. Emerging from men’s activist movements of the 1970s, the contemporary MRM utilizes the language of social justice and equality to argue for political and legal actions impacting client well-being and access. This presentation explores the history and ideology of the MRM and the implications for counselors.