Title

Three Keys for Overcoming Resistace to Social Change

Author Information

Peter VajdaFollow

Conference Strand

Social Change, Leadership, and Advocacy

Abstract

In spite of the vast number of social change efforts – academic, professional, corporate, religious, etc. – which focus on racial identity development, ethnic identity development, and gender and sexual orientation, resistance to social change abounds in in our culture. An exploration of the root cause of people's resistance to social change (and knowing and practicing how to move thought this resistance) is necessary to not only understand the dynamics of multi-ethnic and multi-racial groups in the United States, but to lead folks to embrace an anti-oppressive, multicultural perspective which is driven by a psycho-emotional-spiritual state that reflects openness, acceptance, inclusion, equanimity, and inner peace.

Description

Objectives:

1. Understand the mind/intellect alone cannot effect true and real social change; the inner wisdom of the heart and body are necessary for social change to be lasting and sustainable

2. Understand and practice with mindfulness and focusing (right-brain) activities that support one to experience the state wherein one's real and authentic self can show up; the self that is more open and receptive to social change

3. Practice allowing one's fear, accepting one's fear and feeling one's fear in a mindful way that provides the doorway into transformative change and growth

Take aways:

  1. When I'm acting as a self-aware, mature, and responsible adult (rather than an unconscious emotionally reactive 4-5-6 year old), and I experience myself in a state of equanimity, inner peace, calm, balance and harmony, I'm more open, accepting, and curious, and less defensive and reactive about social change.

  2. I didn't know what I didn't know about how my early-childhood self-limiting and self-sabotaging programming (e.g., beliefs, attitudes, assumptions, expectations and "stories" etc.) shows up in my adult life.

  3. While the trigger for my reactivity to social change may be "out there," the cause of my reactivity is inside me. It's never about "him," "her," "it" or "them." It's about me.

    Audience: Those whose capacity to contribute to, and support, the health and well-being of their community, their organizations, their schools and universities, their personal and professional relationships, and their capacity to perform and produce is hampered by their inability or unwillingness to adapt to social change. Those who allow their (often self-limiting, often unconscious) hard-wired perceptions, assumptions, beliefs, and "stories" to get in the way of being more committed, engaged, open and accepting of social change. Those who overtly or covertly allow their resistance to social change to cloud their objective evaluation of events, circumstances, people, choices and decisions.

Evidence

The Social Cognitive Neuroscience of Leading Organizational Change: TiER1 Performance Solutions' Guide for Managers and Consultants;

The neuroscience of change: Why it's difficult and what makes it easier - Langley Group

http://www.apa.org/monitor/jan02/frontier.aspx

]https://www.neuroscience.ox.ac.uk/research/social-psychology-and-social-neuroscience

My 25 years experience as an executive and professional coach in the area of change, my book: http://www.truenorthpartnering.com/becoming-a-better-you

Diversity Resistance in Organizations (Applied Psychology Series)

Diversity at Work: The Practice of Inclusion

to suggest a few

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Peter Vajda, Ph.D., C.P.C. is an astute observer of the human condition and is a passionate pioneer in the field of mind-body-spirit integrative functioning and development. Dr. Vajda is dedicated to supporting individuals and groups to enhance their understanding of how to live consciously in, and from, the state of well-being that arises from the inside out which deeply supports an individual's ability to change, grow and evolve.

Peter brings a diversified base of professional expertise - as an entrepreneur, an educator, a facilitator, and a manager. He is sensitive to the diverse perspectives, demands and dynamics of relationships. Since 1981, he has facilitated individuals, couples, groups and organizations.

His life and the orientation he brings to coaching, consulting and facilitating are deeply influenced by his understanding of, and his experience in personal growth and spiritual realization that integrate the insights of contemporary psychology and psychodynamics.

For over twenty-five years, Peter's has been committed to his own personal and spiritual development. His experience in working with the "whole body" is based on his studies of psychodynamics, ego development, bioenergetics as well as energy healing. He has been a student and practitioner of meditation, mindfulness and visualization for over twenty years and incorporates these practices in his work with his clients.

Peter earned his Ph.D. in Education and Cognitive Psychology from Fordham University. His post-graduate work is in organizational behavior at NYU's Stern School of Business.

For the past 15 years he has written a weekly column – “Food-For-Thought” - focusing on moving through the obstacles and barriers that stand in the way of meaningful change. He writes a weekly column – Know Thyself - for the widely acclaimed international website – Management Issues.

His book– Becoming a Better You, Who You Are vs. Who You Think You Are – was published in October, 2013.

Start Date

2-10-2018 10:15 AM

End Date

2-10-2018 11:30 AM

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Feb 10th, 10:15 AM Feb 10th, 11:30 AM

Three Keys for Overcoming Resistace to Social Change

In spite of the vast number of social change efforts – academic, professional, corporate, religious, etc. – which focus on racial identity development, ethnic identity development, and gender and sexual orientation, resistance to social change abounds in in our culture. An exploration of the root cause of people's resistance to social change (and knowing and practicing how to move thought this resistance) is necessary to not only understand the dynamics of multi-ethnic and multi-racial groups in the United States, but to lead folks to embrace an anti-oppressive, multicultural perspective which is driven by a psycho-emotional-spiritual state that reflects openness, acceptance, inclusion, equanimity, and inner peace.