Title

Asian and Latino Students’ Preparation to Counsel White Clients: A Critical Perspective

Conference Strand

Research and Theory

Abstract

Most cross-cultural training research has focused on training students to work with clients of color, with little research specifying how programs prepare Asian and Latino students to experience cross-cultural interactions with White clients as well as the unique challenges they encounter when counseling white clients. This presentation will present qualitative findings and provide practical and research implications.

Description

Theme: Research and Theory

Counselor training programs are tasked with preparing future counselors to work with diverse clients, however the needs, expectations and experiences of counseling students differ (Coleman, 2006). Latino and Asian students are growing populations within counselor training programs (Ng & Lau, 2011). These students have expressed concerns about effectively serving diverse clientele and adequately applying counseling skills (Cavazos, Alvarado, Rodriguez & Iruegas, 2009; Dickson, Argus-Calvo &Tafoya, 2010). Latino and Asian students have also reported unique experiences in the classroom. Some non-native, English speaking Latino counselors in training reported higher levels of language anxiety during class than their native English speaking peers (Haley, Marin & Gelgand, 2015). Asian counselors and psychologists described feelings of discrimination and lower confidence levels during their classroom and internship experiences (Goh et al., 2014). These studies illustrate the unique experiences and outcomes for Latino and Asian counselors in training and illuminate the need for critical investigation. The purpose of this study was to critically examine the preparation Latino and Asian students receive to counsel White clients.

Objectives:

Attendees will be able to identify 5 themes that identify how Asian and Latino students experience preparation to counsel White clients

Attendees will be able to identify 3 practical implications that programs/departments can utilize to address the needs of the noted population

Attendees will be able to identify 3 research implications that pointedly address ways that researchers can expand the current study and incorporate additional qualitative and quantitative inquiry.

Implications and Practical Solutions that this research speaks to:

Solutions encompass a four-fold approach: a) global or systemic changes, b) counselor education training, c) general programmatic pre-planning processes, and d) specific classroom content.

Evidence

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Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Natoya Hill Haskins, PhD, LPC-GA, NCC is an Assistant Professor at the College of William and Mary. Her expertise encompasses school counseling and family issues as well as effective cross cultural training experiences for students of color. Her research interests include students and faculty of color educational and professional supports, advocacy instrumentation, and the application of culturally responsive theoretical frameworks in training and counseling settings.

Leonissa Johnson, PhD, CSC is an Assistant Professor at Clark Atlanta University in Atlanta, Georgia. Her research interests include addressing the counseling needs of English Learners in schools, school counselor self-efficacy, and counselor advocacy.

Location

Room 212

Start Date

2-17-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

2-17-2017 3:45 PM

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Feb 17th, 2:30 PM Feb 17th, 3:45 PM

Asian and Latino Students’ Preparation to Counsel White Clients: A Critical Perspective

Room 212

Most cross-cultural training research has focused on training students to work with clients of color, with little research specifying how programs prepare Asian and Latino students to experience cross-cultural interactions with White clients as well as the unique challenges they encounter when counseling white clients. This presentation will present qualitative findings and provide practical and research implications.