Title

Creating A More Inclusive Feminist Identity Development Model

Conference Strand

Identity Formation

Abstract

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has highlighted identity differences among feminists. Downing and Roush’s (1984) feminist identity development model was based on privileging White women but today’s young feminists are more focused on oppression of all targeted groups and more inclusive of women of color and men. They rejected Clinton’s feminist identity. We need to develop a new feminist identity model.

Description

Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign has highlighted the ideological and identity differences among those who identify as feminists. It would seem that the first woman representing a major political party running for president would be a reason for celebration of all those who identify as feminists. However, Hillary Clinton and her candidacy appears to represent feminists from her generation (the second wave of feminism--1960’s – 1980’s. These views are reflected in the Feminist Identity Development Model published in 1985 by Downing and Roush. This era of feminists sought to privilege women’s experience by focused mostly on gaining rights and access for White women. The 3rd (1980-2013) and 4th (2013-present) waves of feminists are more focused on oppression, in general, and more inclusive of women of color and men. The two philosophical approaches have clashed and the most obvious result of that clash is that many younger women reject the feminist ideas of the Democratic presidential nominee. Women of color rejected that model from its inception and were more likely to be identified as Womanists or Hip Hop feminists. Ironically, based on philosophy, all feminists and womanists oppose oppression of all kinds and all feminist promote social justice. Perhaps now is the time to work on revising or creating a new feminist identity model to be reflective of all feminist philosophies.

This session will be devoted to presenting idea of a new feminist identity model and engaging a dialog with participants to create that new model. The goals of the session will be to a) identify developmental processes of millennial feminist, womanists and men b) synthesize those processes with the Downing and Roush model c) create a framework this new model of feminist identity. .

Evidence

Bronstein, C. (2005). Representing the third wave: Mainstream print media framing of a new feminist movement. Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly, 82(4), 783-803.

Crocker, L. (2016). Why millennials don't like Hillary. Daily Beast http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2015/10/05/why-millennial-feminists-don-t-like-hillary.html

Dicker, R., & Piepmeier, A. (Eds.). (2016). Catching a wave: Reclaiming feminism for the 21st century. Northeastern University Press.

Fortini, A. (2013). The Feminist Reawakening. New York Magazine, na http://nymag. com/news/features/46011/, datum ogleda, 3(5), 2013.

Liss, M., Hoffner, C., & Crawford, M. (2000). What do feminists believe?.Psychology of Women Quarterly, 24(4), 279-284.

Munro, E. (2013). Feminism: A fourth wave?. Political insight, 4(2), 22-25.

Peoples, W. A. (2007). " Under Construction": Identifying Foundations of Hip-Hop Feminism and Exploring Bridges between Black Second-Wave and Hip-Hop Feminisms 1. Meridians: feminism, race, transnationalism, 8(1), 19-52.

Roth, B. (2004). Separate roads to feminism: Black, Chicana, and White feminist movements in America's second wave. Cambridge University Press.

Format

Individual Presentations

Biographical Sketch

Kathy Evans, Ph.D., LPC, NCC, has been an Associate Professor at the University of South Carolina for 21 years. Her publications and presentations focus on multicultural, feminist, and career issues. She is a co-author of Introduction to Feminist Therapy: Strategies for Social and Individual Change.

Tiffany M. Bordonada is a doctoral candidate in the Counselor Education and Supervision program at the University of South Carolina. She has a Master of Science in Rehabilitation Counseling and Master of Public Administration from West Virginia University. Her past work experiences include working with adults with disabilities in an outpatient setting and adolescent sex offenders in a residential setting. The presenters’ research interests consist of caregiver issues, people with disabilities, and well-being.

Katherine A. Feather is a licensed professional counselor (LPC) and a doctoral candidate in the Counselor Education & Supervision program at the University of South Carolina. The presenter has an extensive history working with children and families with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and has published and presented on this topic at the regional, national, and international level. Katherine is currently the mental health counselor at the SC Commission for the Blind in the adjustment to blindness program where she assists adults in adjusting to their visual disability. Her research interests ASD, school-to-career transition of students with disabilities, and psychosocial adjustment and family adaptation to a disability.

Dr. Tiffany Rogers is a Lecturer in the Counselor Education program in the Department of Education and Human Development at Clemson University. She completed her Ph.D. in Counselor Education at the University of South Carolina and received both her master’s degree in Counselor Education and her bachelor’s degree in Psychology from Georgia Southern University. She is a Nationally Certified Counselor (NCC) and has worked in the fields of victim advocacy, addictions, college counseling, and adolescent in-patient treatment. Her research interests include young adult self-efficacy, social justice and advocacy, feminism, and intimate partner violence

Location

Room 218/220

Start Date

2-17-2017 2:30 PM

End Date

2-17-2017 3:45 PM

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Feb 17th, 2:30 PM Feb 17th, 3:45 PM

Creating A More Inclusive Feminist Identity Development Model

Room 218/220

Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign has highlighted identity differences among feminists. Downing and Roush’s (1984) feminist identity development model was based on privileging White women but today’s young feminists are more focused on oppression of all targeted groups and more inclusive of women of color and men. They rejected Clinton’s feminist identity. We need to develop a new feminist identity model.