Authors

Chao Li, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Dan Li, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and PreventionFollow
Shirley JoAnn Smart, Georgia Southern University, Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health
Lei Zhou, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Peng Yang, Beijing Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Jianming Ou, Fujian Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Yi He, Shanghai Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Ruiqi Ren, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Tao Ma, Nanjing Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Nijuan Xiang, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Haitian Sui, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Yali Wang, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Jian Zhao, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Chaonan Wang, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Yeping Wang, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Daxin Ni, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Isaac Chun-Hai Fung, Georgia Southern University, Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public HealthFollow
Dexin Li, Institute for Viral Disease, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention
Yangmu Huang, Peking University
Qun Li, Public Health Emergency Center, Chinese Center for Disease Control and PreventionFollow

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

6-30-2020

Publication Title

Western Pacific Surveillance and Response

DOI

https://doi.org/10.5365/wpsar.v11i2.606

ISSN

2094-7313

Abstract

During the yellow fever epidemic in Angola in 2016, cases of yellow fever were reported in China for the first time. The 11 cases, all Chinese nationals returning from Angola, were identified in March and April 2016, one to two weeks after the peak of the Angolan epidemic. One patient died; the other 10 cases recovered after treatment. This paper reviews the epidemiological characteristics of the 11 yellow fever cases imported into China. It examines case detection and disease control and surveillance, and presents recommendations for further action to prevent additional importation of yellow fever into China.

Comments

The articles in this publication are published by the World Health Organization and contain contributions by individual authors. The articles are available under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 IGO license (CC BY 3.0 IGO http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/igo/legalcode), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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