Proposal Title

Authorship credit and co-inquirer learning in faculty-student SoTL projects

Track

Non-Research Proposal / About SoTL

Proposal Abstract

The collaborative interdisciplinary nature of much SoTL work, along with the increasing focus of SoTL on students as co-inquirers into SoTL research, creates unique issues and challenges in ethically assigning authorship credit on SoTL projects. Additionally, given the focus of SoTL on student learning, it is critical to explicitly focus attention on student co-inquirers’ learning during the research process. Informed by seminal disciplinary papers on authorship issues and best practices in undergraduate research, this session proposes a new model to identify the relative contributions of student collaborators and explicitly incorporate a process-focused approach to collaborative faculty-student SoTL projects.

Proposal Description

Determining authorship credit and order in collaborative research projects can be difficult, can introduce or increase conflict in the research environment, and can exacerbate existing inequalities and power dynamics between team members. As a result, much disciplinary scholarship has been written to develop potential guidelines for authorship credit and order. For SoTL scholars, many of whom engage in interdisciplinary research, the problem becomes even more acute because there are no established guidelines for working across disciplines (Nguyen & Nguyen, 2006).

SoTL has increasingly embraced involving students, especially undergraduates, as co-inquirers into SoTL scholarship (Bovill, Cook-Sather, & Felten, 2011; Felten, 2013; Felten et al., 2013), and research collaborations between faculty and students involve unique inequalities and power dynamics (Fine & Kurdek, 1993; Thompson, 1994). Additionally, unlike Boyer’s (1990) other three scholarships (i.e., discovery, integration, and application), SoTL is uniquely focused on research into student learning. This necessitates attention not only to the final disseminated product of the SoTL project and what that product tells us about student learning, but also attention to the process of the scholarship (Gilpin, 2009), and what the student co-inquirers learn from conducting the scholarship. By focusing only on authorship guidelines, we might obscure a very important part of the learning process for the students actually engaging in the scholarship.

Informed by seminal disciplinary papers on authorship issues and best practices in undergraduate research, this session proposes a new model to identify the relative contributions of student collaborators and explicitly incorporate a process-focused approach to collaborative faculty-student SoTL projects. The session will discuss implications of applying this new model to collaborative SoTL projects, including new ways to focus attention on student learning from research. The presenter will work a case study that applies the new model with the attendees to demonstrate how the model can be used.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 3

Publication Type and Release Option

Event

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Mar 30th, 10:00 AM Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

Authorship credit and co-inquirer learning in faculty-student SoTL projects

Room 3

The collaborative interdisciplinary nature of much SoTL work, along with the increasing focus of SoTL on students as co-inquirers into SoTL research, creates unique issues and challenges in ethically assigning authorship credit on SoTL projects. Additionally, given the focus of SoTL on student learning, it is critical to explicitly focus attention on student co-inquirers’ learning during the research process. Informed by seminal disciplinary papers on authorship issues and best practices in undergraduate research, this session proposes a new model to identify the relative contributions of student collaborators and explicitly incorporate a process-focused approach to collaborative faculty-student SoTL projects.