Track

Research Proposal / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

College and university instructors across disciplines are well aware of the pedagogical challenges particular to introductory-level courses. What might be less frequently discussed, though, and yet more complex and increasingly pressing, are the ramifications of these complex pedagogical questions in the design and implementation of program assessment. This research in progress takes a grounded theory approach to assessment of introductory literature courses (ILCs) at a large public university with the view of designing program assessment (to be implemented 2017-18) that accounts for the learning goals and teaching practices of ILCs alongside those more firmly rooted in the English major.

Proposal Description

College and university instructors across disciplines are well aware of the pedagogical challenges particular to introductory-level courses: How do I teach a specialized discipline to students from varying backgrounds and with varying levels of preparation and interest? Given one semester to do it, how can I not only incite my students to engage thoughtfully with the discipline, but also ascertain what learning happens when they do so? What might be less frequently discussed, though, and yet more complex and increasingly pressing, are the ramifications of these complex pedagogical questions in the design and implementation of program assessment. Without a clearly articulated set of desired learning outcomes for a department’s introductory-level course offerings—one that takes into account the goals and expectations of all key stakeholders—program assessment can all too easily overlook the important work of educating non-majors in the perennial administrative drive to demonstrate what a department does for its majors. This research in progress takes a grounded theory approach to assessment of introductory literature courses (ILCs) at a large public university. By collecting and analyzing interview data from the instructors, administrators, and students currently delivering and experiencing ILC curriculum, this study seeks to identify and articulate the otherwise implicit shared beliefs and goals for local ILCs. These preliminary findings lay the foundation for a program assessment (to be implemented in 2017-18) that accounts for the learning goals and teaching practices of ILCs alongside those more firmly rooted in the English major. This poster presentation will outline the three phases of the larger study (grounded theory data collection and analysis, assessment design, and assessment implementation) and offer discussion of preliminary findings of the first phase.

Session Format

Student Voices in SoTL Poster Session

Location

Room 2

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Previous Versions

Apr 24 2017

 
Mar 30th, 10:00 AM Mar 30th, 10:45 AM

A Grounded Theory Approach to Introductory Literature Program Assessment

Room 2

College and university instructors across disciplines are well aware of the pedagogical challenges particular to introductory-level courses. What might be less frequently discussed, though, and yet more complex and increasingly pressing, are the ramifications of these complex pedagogical questions in the design and implementation of program assessment. This research in progress takes a grounded theory approach to assessment of introductory literature courses (ILCs) at a large public university with the view of designing program assessment (to be implemented 2017-18) that accounts for the learning goals and teaching practices of ILCs alongside those more firmly rooted in the English major.