Proposal Title

Assessing Curricular Reinforcement of Pharmacy Compounding Skills

Co-Authors

Srinidi Mohan, University of New England (Maine)

Track

Research Proposal / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Pharmaceutical compounding is unique to the pharmacy profession, with Colleges of Pharmacy having incorporated ‘practical compounding laboratory exercises’ in their curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated and instructor-independent compounding exercises for skill reinforcement, where instructors would assess the student’s grades between singly executed lab exercises versus reinforced lab exercises. The students were required to provide feedback's using anonymous surveys that judged the students on their levels of confidence, ability to overcome independent compounding issues, and improvement in skills based on singly executed exercises versus reinforced exercises.

Proposal Description

Pharmaceutical compounding is the science of creating personalized pharmaceutical products, which are tailored to meet the unique requirement of a patient. The principles of pharmaceutical compounding go beyond dosages and formulations, and often provide immense contributions in many aspects of drug research and development.

Of concern, recent studies have reported a growing trend of diminished compounding skills among graduating pharmacists. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of compounding skill reinforcement through instructor-independent repetition modules; wherein, students in their first didactic year at College of Pharmacy (UNE) were trained in compounding skills.

In this study, for the first three weeks, students were asked to prepare prescriptions based on instructor coordinated labs and were provided with additional materials (lab manual, demonstration videos). For the next three weeks, in addition to an instructor guided compounding lab session, students were instructed to repeat a prescription without any instructor guidance. At the end of each three week session, students were asked to repeat or prepare a formulation without previous repetition. They were tested for the level of concept and skill retention qualitatively through pre-session and post-session surveys, and also via analytical assessment of their overall preparation.

Student survey results showed a 91% positive response rate favoring repetition, beyond instructor guidance, to be an effective tool in providing improvement in their understanding of skill and compounding concepts. This result was also found to significantly correlate with atleast 33% improvement in the overall prescription quality and active ingredient accuracy (as determined by analytical quantification). In conclusion, the methodology of instructor independent repetition demonstrates initial benefit towards improving overall student skills, confidence and trouble-shooting abilities. The current methodology would require further refinement, along with additional elective courses on advance drug compounding, to better suit the curricular delivery for drug compounding in the near future.

Session Format

Presentation Session

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Mar 30th, 9:00 AM Mar 30th, 9:45 AM

Assessing Curricular Reinforcement of Pharmacy Compounding Skills

Pharmaceutical compounding is unique to the pharmacy profession, with Colleges of Pharmacy having incorporated ‘practical compounding laboratory exercises’ in their curriculum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of repeated and instructor-independent compounding exercises for skill reinforcement, where instructors would assess the student’s grades between singly executed lab exercises versus reinforced lab exercises. The students were required to provide feedback's using anonymous surveys that judged the students on their levels of confidence, ability to overcome independent compounding issues, and improvement in skills based on singly executed exercises versus reinforced exercises.