Proposal Title

Giving Students’ Voice: Examining Transformational Methods to Engage Student Learning

Co-Authors

N/A

Track

Research Project / Assessment of Student Learning

Proposal Abstract

The idea to challenge students’ abilities and willingness to discuss topics of race, gender, sexuality, class, and disability arose when sport management faculty frustratingly found that many students had narrow views on such topics. Despite students completing a course geared to discuss social issues, students lacked sympathetic mindsets when discussing law and policy development in upper division courses. Therefore a SoTL study was conducted in a 17-week semester in two social issues courses to examine changes in students’ social awareness. Class A used traditional methods of lectures, testing, and discussion activities. Class B used transformational methods guided by the professor that included student produced lectures, reflective activities, observation assignments, and student guided discussions. Both classes completed pre- and post- surveys.

Surprisingly we found that at the end of the semester, Class A was more interested in discussing the sensitive topics. In contrast, Class B appeared to be more aware of current situations but lacked enthusiasm. Attendees at this session will learn about the impact of giving students a voice early in the academic semester and how sensitive information is received and maintained when the students guide their own learning. Additionally, evidence will be provided and the methods used to encourage discussion and learning from the students.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 211

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 10:00 AM Mar 31st, 10:45 AM

Giving Students’ Voice: Examining Transformational Methods to Engage Student Learning

Room 211

The idea to challenge students’ abilities and willingness to discuss topics of race, gender, sexuality, class, and disability arose when sport management faculty frustratingly found that many students had narrow views on such topics. Despite students completing a course geared to discuss social issues, students lacked sympathetic mindsets when discussing law and policy development in upper division courses. Therefore a SoTL study was conducted in a 17-week semester in two social issues courses to examine changes in students’ social awareness. Class A used traditional methods of lectures, testing, and discussion activities. Class B used transformational methods guided by the professor that included student produced lectures, reflective activities, observation assignments, and student guided discussions. Both classes completed pre- and post- surveys.

Surprisingly we found that at the end of the semester, Class A was more interested in discussing the sensitive topics. In contrast, Class B appeared to be more aware of current situations but lacked enthusiasm. Attendees at this session will learn about the impact of giving students a voice early in the academic semester and how sensitive information is received and maintained when the students guide their own learning. Additionally, evidence will be provided and the methods used to encourage discussion and learning from the students.