Co-Authors

Dr. G. Wayne Freeman

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Current research suggests that college entrepreneurship courses tend to be abstract and lack concrete experiential elements that encompass the total entrepreneurial experience. Using an 18-point model rubric, this case study will detail how to incorporate semester-long functional small businesses, within limitations, that enhance and stimulate the learning experience. Important to this rubric has been an integrated business program in which previous courses teach needed skills in the areas of economics, accounting, finance, marketing, and management. The rubric is used as a tool against which learning is measured and pushes the students toward discovery of entrepreneurial engagement. Appropriate models/ systems per rubric item are sequentially taught. Assignments reflect this sequence of acquired student knowledge. Pairs of students as business partners account for all facets of the business especially following the money. The efficacy of the model rubric is evident in longitudinal post-curricular qualitative feedback from 8 years of participants. All students provide journaled reflection and present their findings as their ‘final’ for the course. Results from this feedback are presented. The presentation of this rubric will demonstrate a feasibility of semester-long businesses as an effective entrepreneurship experience teaching tool.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 217

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
Mar 30th, 2:00 PM Mar 30th, 2:45 PM

The Efficacy of a Model Rubric to Enhance Experiential Learning in an Entrepreneurship Course: A Case Study

Room 217

Current research suggests that college entrepreneurship courses tend to be abstract and lack concrete experiential elements that encompass the total entrepreneurial experience. Using an 18-point model rubric, this case study will detail how to incorporate semester-long functional small businesses, within limitations, that enhance and stimulate the learning experience. Important to this rubric has been an integrated business program in which previous courses teach needed skills in the areas of economics, accounting, finance, marketing, and management. The rubric is used as a tool against which learning is measured and pushes the students toward discovery of entrepreneurial engagement. Appropriate models/ systems per rubric item are sequentially taught. Assignments reflect this sequence of acquired student knowledge. Pairs of students as business partners account for all facets of the business especially following the money. The efficacy of the model rubric is evident in longitudinal post-curricular qualitative feedback from 8 years of participants. All students provide journaled reflection and present their findings as their ‘final’ for the course. Results from this feedback are presented. The presentation of this rubric will demonstrate a feasibility of semester-long businesses as an effective entrepreneurship experience teaching tool.