Proposal Title

Preparing Pre-Service Teachers in Working with Diverse Learners

Co-Authors

None

Track

Research Project / Teaching with Technology

Proposal Abstract

Meeting the needs of all students, particularly those from diverse backgrounds can be challenging for new teachers. In this poster presentation, we would like to share our results of a study that examined pre-service teachers’ experience in an online book club on the topics of learning disabilities, gifted and talented, dyslexia, second language learners and poverty in an effort to increase their knowledge and skills in working with diverse learners. Book club members met online using a “wiki” application for 12 weeks in the semester. Dialogue was two-way and continuous as members would respond, share their personal connections as well as post their own questions. Participants also created a professional development for their peers and surrounding schools on their book club topic. Seventy-eight percent and twenty percent strongly agreed or agreed respectively that the project better prepared them as a teacher working with students.

Attendees can expect to learn about our study as well as information on how to implement their own virtual book club in their classroom at the K-12 and higher education setting. We would also like to share our future implications with the expansion of literature to include non-fiction genres, including autobiographies.

Session Format

Poster Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 30th, 4:00 PM Mar 30th, 5:00 PM

Preparing Pre-Service Teachers in Working with Diverse Learners

Room 113

Meeting the needs of all students, particularly those from diverse backgrounds can be challenging for new teachers. In this poster presentation, we would like to share our results of a study that examined pre-service teachers’ experience in an online book club on the topics of learning disabilities, gifted and talented, dyslexia, second language learners and poverty in an effort to increase their knowledge and skills in working with diverse learners. Book club members met online using a “wiki” application for 12 weeks in the semester. Dialogue was two-way and continuous as members would respond, share their personal connections as well as post their own questions. Participants also created a professional development for their peers and surrounding schools on their book club topic. Seventy-eight percent and twenty percent strongly agreed or agreed respectively that the project better prepared them as a teacher working with students.

Attendees can expect to learn about our study as well as information on how to implement their own virtual book club in their classroom at the K-12 and higher education setting. We would also like to share our future implications with the expansion of literature to include non-fiction genres, including autobiographies.