Co-Authors

none

Track

Research Project / Online Learning

Proposal Abstract

We have incorporated a critical thinking model into our course on “hate” using Kuhn’s (1999) work on meta-knowing skills, Paul and Endler’s (2002) emphasis on how critical thinking integrates emotions into one’s thinking, and Smith’s (2002) characteristics of critical thinking.

By integrating these approaches into our online classroom, we encourage students to discuss what they know, how they know it, and how those thoughts fit into the broader range of what people know. Additionally, we emphasize that critical thinking is developmental in nature. Smith’s characteristics of critical thinkers shows what critical thinkers would be able to DO that non-critical thinkers would NOT do. The model that results – that assesses student thinking on four developmental levels of (1) recitation, (2) exploration, (3) understanding, and (4) appreciation – provides a framework for “scoring” student work and promoting an understanding of where a student is “falling short” in terms of critical thinking.

This presentation discusses data we have collected on the effectiveness of the model in promoting increases in student tolerance of ambiguity and decreases in egocentric thinking, information on how the model can be incorporated into any discipline and any type of classroom. Faculty will participate in an assignment used in the course.

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 210

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

 
Mar 31st, 11:00 AM Mar 31st, 11:45 AM

A Method to the Madness: Infusing Critical Thinking Strategies Into Online Courses

Room 210

We have incorporated a critical thinking model into our course on “hate” using Kuhn’s (1999) work on meta-knowing skills, Paul and Endler’s (2002) emphasis on how critical thinking integrates emotions into one’s thinking, and Smith’s (2002) characteristics of critical thinking.

By integrating these approaches into our online classroom, we encourage students to discuss what they know, how they know it, and how those thoughts fit into the broader range of what people know. Additionally, we emphasize that critical thinking is developmental in nature. Smith’s characteristics of critical thinkers shows what critical thinkers would be able to DO that non-critical thinkers would NOT do. The model that results – that assesses student thinking on four developmental levels of (1) recitation, (2) exploration, (3) understanding, and (4) appreciation – provides a framework for “scoring” student work and promoting an understanding of where a student is “falling short” in terms of critical thinking.

This presentation discusses data we have collected on the effectiveness of the model in promoting increases in student tolerance of ambiguity and decreases in egocentric thinking, information on how the model can be incorporated into any discipline and any type of classroom. Faculty will participate in an assignment used in the course.