Proposal Title

Client Education Handouts as a Veterinary Student Learning Module

Co-Authors

none

Track

Research Project / Learning Theories and Pedagogy

Proposal Abstract

Second year veterinary students were asked to design a client handout as a specific learning tool. The students elected to form their own 3 or 4 person groups and pick from 6 endocrine disease choices. They were asked to create an approachable, and informational brochure that would be understandable to owners without a medical background. The handouts were graded for correct information, attractiveness, and understandability for non-medical people. The handouts formed 20% of the students’ grade. At the end of the course the students were asked to voluntarily complete an anonymous questionnaire concerning the value of the handouts to student learning. Data from 3 classes were evaluated. Ninety five percent (203/214) of students answered the questionnaire. Eight nine percent of students felt the project increased their learning and 90% would recommend including the project for students in the following year. The most common reasons cited for the project value was to increase communication skills for owners and to help for test preparation. The majority of the self-chosen groups were of the same gender (65%). The study was approved by the University of Georgia Institutional Review Board (STUDY00002810).

Session Format

Presentation Session

Location

Room 113

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 31st, 4:00 PM Mar 31st, 5:00 PM

Client Education Handouts as a Veterinary Student Learning Module

Room 113

Second year veterinary students were asked to design a client handout as a specific learning tool. The students elected to form their own 3 or 4 person groups and pick from 6 endocrine disease choices. They were asked to create an approachable, and informational brochure that would be understandable to owners without a medical background. The handouts were graded for correct information, attractiveness, and understandability for non-medical people. The handouts formed 20% of the students’ grade. At the end of the course the students were asked to voluntarily complete an anonymous questionnaire concerning the value of the handouts to student learning. Data from 3 classes were evaluated. Ninety five percent (203/214) of students answered the questionnaire. Eight nine percent of students felt the project increased their learning and 90% would recommend including the project for students in the following year. The most common reasons cited for the project value was to increase communication skills for owners and to help for test preparation. The majority of the self-chosen groups were of the same gender (65%). The study was approved by the University of Georgia Institutional Review Board (STUDY00002810).