Proposal Title

Connecting the Variables: Designing Active Learning Experiences That Work

Proposal Abstract

This case study connects institutional realities and priorities, student cohort characteristics, diversity of learning styles and responses to active learning and high impact practices, usefulness of comparative longitudinal assessment data that builds faculty and student learning teams and effective, meaningful teaching/learning situations. Data are derived from assessment of two Anthropology courses for majors and non-majors over a three year period as part of a pilot project that while meeting university goals permitted individual faculty to recognize strengths and weaknesses, make frequent adjustments to content and processes and establish an integration of course goals with specific assignments. Consistent with other studies, the data have indicated the importance of student diversity variables, majors,years at university, millennial patterns, international status, cultural norms, gender identity, socio-economic factors including parental educational, U.S. regional variation and locality type in understanding student success and active participation in the learning process. Results indicate how the gestalt of each class, transparency, integration of materials, flexibility, continual reflection and evaluation of learning goals have applicability to override disciplinary differences.

Location

Rooms 113 & 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

Share

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 5:00 PM Mar 25th, 6:00 PM

Connecting the Variables: Designing Active Learning Experiences That Work

Rooms 113 & 115

This case study connects institutional realities and priorities, student cohort characteristics, diversity of learning styles and responses to active learning and high impact practices, usefulness of comparative longitudinal assessment data that builds faculty and student learning teams and effective, meaningful teaching/learning situations. Data are derived from assessment of two Anthropology courses for majors and non-majors over a three year period as part of a pilot project that while meeting university goals permitted individual faculty to recognize strengths and weaknesses, make frequent adjustments to content and processes and establish an integration of course goals with specific assignments. Consistent with other studies, the data have indicated the importance of student diversity variables, majors,years at university, millennial patterns, international status, cultural norms, gender identity, socio-economic factors including parental educational, U.S. regional variation and locality type in understanding student success and active participation in the learning process. Results indicate how the gestalt of each class, transparency, integration of materials, flexibility, continual reflection and evaluation of learning goals have applicability to override disciplinary differences.