Proposal Title

Does Student-Teacher Interaction Matter in Distance Education?

Proposal Abstract

This research explores the impact of student-teacher interaction on student outcomes in distance education. Using a quasi-experimental design, the research compares a completely asynchronous online tutorial with no student-teacher interaction to a tutorial that is identical except that a portion is replaced with a synchronous intervention that promotes teacher student interaction. Student outcomes are identified using achievement and satisfaction measures.

The sample for this research consisted of students at a small liberal arts colleges that volunteered to enroll in a tutorial on the APA Style® as detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The tutorial was designed and delivered for the purpose of this research. Student learning was assessed using a knowledge test before and after the course and student satisfaction was assessed using an end-of course evaluation. The data was statistically analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between the two course deliveries.

This presentation is supported by data and tests the importance of teacher-student interaction in distance education. By asking “Do student-teacher interactions matter in distance education?” a lively discussion is expected and encouraged as all participants debate the findings. This study provides useful guidance that can be used in the classroom and will significantly contribute to the scholarship of teaching and learning. Audience feedback is welcomed.

Location

Room 2011

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 4:00 PM Mar 26th, 4:45 PM

Does Student-Teacher Interaction Matter in Distance Education?

Room 2011

This research explores the impact of student-teacher interaction on student outcomes in distance education. Using a quasi-experimental design, the research compares a completely asynchronous online tutorial with no student-teacher interaction to a tutorial that is identical except that a portion is replaced with a synchronous intervention that promotes teacher student interaction. Student outcomes are identified using achievement and satisfaction measures.

The sample for this research consisted of students at a small liberal arts colleges that volunteered to enroll in a tutorial on the APA Style® as detailed in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. The tutorial was designed and delivered for the purpose of this research. Student learning was assessed using a knowledge test before and after the course and student satisfaction was assessed using an end-of course evaluation. The data was statistically analyzed to determine if there was a significant difference between the two course deliveries.

This presentation is supported by data and tests the importance of teacher-student interaction in distance education. By asking “Do student-teacher interactions matter in distance education?” a lively discussion is expected and encouraged as all participants debate the findings. This study provides useful guidance that can be used in the classroom and will significantly contribute to the scholarship of teaching and learning. Audience feedback is welcomed.