Proposal Title

One Pedagogy Paradigm for Higher Education: Overcoming Challenges and Cultivating New Knowledge and Practices

Proposal Abstract

Fink writes (2013) that a shift is occurring in American higher education pedagogy as teachers think about “not just on how much students learn but on the quality of that learning” (p.21). In this research presentation the process and results of a course redesign effort based on Fink’s (2013) Integrated Course Design model is described. The author’s teaching evaluations from four years of teaching an undergraduate teacher education core curriculum course, Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age, motivated participation in a summer long course redesign process. Analysis and summary of teaching evaluations from before and after the course redesign implementation are presented. The audience will learn about this course redesign model which is completed in twelve steps divided among three broad phases: 1) Build strong primary components, 2) assemble the components into a coherent whole, and 3) finish remaining tasks. The author found the initial phase, build strong primary components, to be the most powerful and useful for course redesign due to the reflection necessary to complete Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Discussion questions with the audience follows the presentation.

References

Fink, L. Dee (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.

Location

Room 2010

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 25th, 2:00 PM Mar 25th, 2:45 PM

One Pedagogy Paradigm for Higher Education: Overcoming Challenges and Cultivating New Knowledge and Practices

Room 2010

Fink writes (2013) that a shift is occurring in American higher education pedagogy as teachers think about “not just on how much students learn but on the quality of that learning” (p.21). In this research presentation the process and results of a course redesign effort based on Fink’s (2013) Integrated Course Design model is described. The author’s teaching evaluations from four years of teaching an undergraduate teacher education core curriculum course, Teaching and Learning in the Digital Age, motivated participation in a summer long course redesign process. Analysis and summary of teaching evaluations from before and after the course redesign implementation are presented. The audience will learn about this course redesign model which is completed in twelve steps divided among three broad phases: 1) Build strong primary components, 2) assemble the components into a coherent whole, and 3) finish remaining tasks. The author found the initial phase, build strong primary components, to be the most powerful and useful for course redesign due to the reflection necessary to complete Fink’s Taxonomy of Significant Learning. Discussion questions with the audience follows the presentation.

References

Fink, L. Dee (2013). Creating significant learning experiences: An integrated approach to designing college courses. San Francisco: John Wiley & Sons.