Proposal Abstract

In this session, the presenter will show how, in an attempt to improve critical thinking in an online Business Law course, he applied two related paradigms of impactful teaching: 1) the ARCS Model of Motivational Design (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction), by Dr. John Keller of Florida State University; and 2) the use of “emotional intensity,” elucidated by Dr. Linda Nilson, founding director of the Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation at Clemson University, in her SoTL presentations on teaching to how the mind works and in her book, Teaching at Its Best. In support of these teaching foundations, the presenter embedded throughout his course’s Learning Modules 26 film scenes and 22 short vignettes that he wrote, whose source material was legal news. The film scenes illustrated key legal doctrines and were used for critical thinking assignments. The short stories (presented as print and audio files) provided a real-world immediacy to the material. As part of this session, the presenter will show how learning, critical thinking and student satisfaction increased as a result of the media additions, and will provide attendees a set of tools to apply the narrative approach to their teaching practices.

Location

Room 1002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 25th, 3:00 PM Mar 25th, 3:45 PM

How Learning Emotions and the ARCS Model of Motivational Design Enhance Learning and Improve Critical Thinking

Room 1002

In this session, the presenter will show how, in an attempt to improve critical thinking in an online Business Law course, he applied two related paradigms of impactful teaching: 1) the ARCS Model of Motivational Design (Attention, Relevance, Confidence, and Satisfaction), by Dr. John Keller of Florida State University; and 2) the use of “emotional intensity,” elucidated by Dr. Linda Nilson, founding director of the Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation at Clemson University, in her SoTL presentations on teaching to how the mind works and in her book, Teaching at Its Best. In support of these teaching foundations, the presenter embedded throughout his course’s Learning Modules 26 film scenes and 22 short vignettes that he wrote, whose source material was legal news. The film scenes illustrated key legal doctrines and were used for critical thinking assignments. The short stories (presented as print and audio files) provided a real-world immediacy to the material. As part of this session, the presenter will show how learning, critical thinking and student satisfaction increased as a result of the media additions, and will provide attendees a set of tools to apply the narrative approach to their teaching practices.