Proposal Abstract

There is contradictory evidence in pedagogical literature on how compulsory attendance policies affect student performance. There is evidence that increasing attendance rates has a positive impact on students’ grades in a course. Some studies have shown that the impact of increased lecture attendance and student performance is tenuous and some studies have even shown that compulsory attendance policies may be detrimental to student success. Panel members will share institutional findings related to students’ and faculty members’ perceptions about attendance policies. This session will also discuss the results from a discipline-specific case, in which the impact of instituting a compulsory attendance policy for two introductory science courses (Principles of Chemistry I and Introduction to Environmental Science) was explored. Data on student attendance rates, performance on individual exams, and overall course grades will be presented for semesters before and after the implementation of the attendance policy. Analyses of the impacts of the attendance policy on student performance and participant feedback will be provided to explore the disconnect between improvements in student attendance and the lack of improvement in student performance in the courses. Panel members and attendees will exchange views on any differences that may exist across institutions and disciplines.

Location

Room 1220 B

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 26th, 4:00 PM Mar 26th, 4:45 PM

A Case Study on the Effectiveness of Attendance Policies in Introductory Science Courses

Room 1220 B

There is contradictory evidence in pedagogical literature on how compulsory attendance policies affect student performance. There is evidence that increasing attendance rates has a positive impact on students’ grades in a course. Some studies have shown that the impact of increased lecture attendance and student performance is tenuous and some studies have even shown that compulsory attendance policies may be detrimental to student success. Panel members will share institutional findings related to students’ and faculty members’ perceptions about attendance policies. This session will also discuss the results from a discipline-specific case, in which the impact of instituting a compulsory attendance policy for two introductory science courses (Principles of Chemistry I and Introduction to Environmental Science) was explored. Data on student attendance rates, performance on individual exams, and overall course grades will be presented for semesters before and after the implementation of the attendance policy. Analyses of the impacts of the attendance policy on student performance and participant feedback will be provided to explore the disconnect between improvements in student attendance and the lack of improvement in student performance in the courses. Panel members and attendees will exchange views on any differences that may exist across institutions and disciplines.