Proposal Title

Influence of iPads on Course Engagement and Learning Outcomes

Proposal Abstract

Introduction: Several university pilot projects suggest that technology, including iPads, supports the learning process. We examined the effect of iPad-integrated classroom activities on academic performance along with student attitudes toward technology, engagement, and perceived learning between two one-semester undergraduate-level Human Anatomy classes.

Method: Learning outcomes were assessed by pre- and posttest scores and final course grades, and perceived engagement and learning were assessed using pre- and post-semester surveys between two simultaneous classes: iPad-integrated (n=24) and non-iPad (n=21).

Results: Analysis of pre- and post-semester surveys indicated that non-iPad users reported higher attainment of course objectives (factual knowledge, principles, theories, and application of material) than iPad users. IPad users reported lower levels of engagement following fifteen weeks of usage whereas non-iPad users reported higher levels of engagement after studying Human Anatomy. Attitudes toward technology, performance expectations, and perceived learning were not impacted by iPad usage. Both iPad and non-iPad users showed similar learning gains based on pre-and post-semester test scores, and final grades.

Conclusions: Contrasting previous research, iPad-integrated classroom activities did not lead to higher self-reported or objective measures of learning outcomes in a Human Anatomy course. Moreover, iPad use led to lower levels of course material engagement compared to traditional activities.

Location

Rooms 113 & 115

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 26th, 5:00 PM Mar 26th, 6:00 PM

Influence of iPads on Course Engagement and Learning Outcomes

Rooms 113 & 115

Introduction: Several university pilot projects suggest that technology, including iPads, supports the learning process. We examined the effect of iPad-integrated classroom activities on academic performance along with student attitudes toward technology, engagement, and perceived learning between two one-semester undergraduate-level Human Anatomy classes.

Method: Learning outcomes were assessed by pre- and posttest scores and final course grades, and perceived engagement and learning were assessed using pre- and post-semester surveys between two simultaneous classes: iPad-integrated (n=24) and non-iPad (n=21).

Results: Analysis of pre- and post-semester surveys indicated that non-iPad users reported higher attainment of course objectives (factual knowledge, principles, theories, and application of material) than iPad users. IPad users reported lower levels of engagement following fifteen weeks of usage whereas non-iPad users reported higher levels of engagement after studying Human Anatomy. Attitudes toward technology, performance expectations, and perceived learning were not impacted by iPad usage. Both iPad and non-iPad users showed similar learning gains based on pre-and post-semester test scores, and final grades.

Conclusions: Contrasting previous research, iPad-integrated classroom activities did not lead to higher self-reported or objective measures of learning outcomes in a Human Anatomy course. Moreover, iPad use led to lower levels of course material engagement compared to traditional activities.