Proposal Abstract

Faculty are learners too! How to teach them to be leaders? For the past four years, UNC-CH has experimented with two formats of a learning community designed to help faculty in leadership roles acquire strategy, planning, and leadership skills and concepts. Scholars who become leaders of research, service, and teaching programs need to be innovative, think entrepreneurially, motivate colleagues, and persuade potential supporters and funders. Faculty leaders must have these skills if our institutions of higher learning are to adapt to current challenges while preserving core academic values. Fifty-three participants have been involved in the four ten month programs. Learning activities to be showcased include: video case studies, peer mentoring, expert consultation, practice in persuasive communication, creating written strategies and visions, as well as carefully selected readings and targeted discussions. An analysis of lessons learned from observation, surveys, and interviews will be presented along with sample strategy presentations developed in the program. During the session, participants will discuss the strategic challenges facing their units, the skills needed to address those challenges, and how they might use these approaches in their organizations. This workshop will reference models and theories of faculty learning communities, communities of practice, and adult learning concepts.

Location

Room 1002

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 27th, 9:00 AM Mar 27th, 9:45 AM

Teaching Innovation via Faculty Learning Communities on Strategy and Leadership

Room 1002

Faculty are learners too! How to teach them to be leaders? For the past four years, UNC-CH has experimented with two formats of a learning community designed to help faculty in leadership roles acquire strategy, planning, and leadership skills and concepts. Scholars who become leaders of research, service, and teaching programs need to be innovative, think entrepreneurially, motivate colleagues, and persuade potential supporters and funders. Faculty leaders must have these skills if our institutions of higher learning are to adapt to current challenges while preserving core academic values. Fifty-three participants have been involved in the four ten month programs. Learning activities to be showcased include: video case studies, peer mentoring, expert consultation, practice in persuasive communication, creating written strategies and visions, as well as carefully selected readings and targeted discussions. An analysis of lessons learned from observation, surveys, and interviews will be presented along with sample strategy presentations developed in the program. During the session, participants will discuss the strategic challenges facing their units, the skills needed to address those challenges, and how they might use these approaches in their organizations. This workshop will reference models and theories of faculty learning communities, communities of practice, and adult learning concepts.