Proposal Abstract

Graduate student teaching assistants (GTAs), both students and instructors simultaneously, have a unique perspective on undergraduate incivility in the classroom. Rehling and Bjorklund (2010) investigated student and faculty perceptions of uncivil behaviors in the classroom. However, GTA perceptions are unknown, and are needed for a complete description. Furthermore, many GTAs will continue teaching in faculty positions. Knowing about their experiences in the classroom will help faculty support them in their development as teachers, benefiting their current and future students. Participants in the session will consider their ideas about incivility and predict how faculty, GTAs, and undergraduate perceptions differ. We will then present our results from a study of GTAs. Finally, the group will brainstorm and discuss the implications of our research for teaching.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 28th, 4:00 PM Mar 28th, 5:30 PM

Graduate Student Teaching Assistant Perceptions of Student Incivility

Concourse

Graduate student teaching assistants (GTAs), both students and instructors simultaneously, have a unique perspective on undergraduate incivility in the classroom. Rehling and Bjorklund (2010) investigated student and faculty perceptions of uncivil behaviors in the classroom. However, GTA perceptions are unknown, and are needed for a complete description. Furthermore, many GTAs will continue teaching in faculty positions. Knowing about their experiences in the classroom will help faculty support them in their development as teachers, benefiting their current and future students. Participants in the session will consider their ideas about incivility and predict how faculty, GTAs, and undergraduate perceptions differ. We will then present our results from a study of GTAs. Finally, the group will brainstorm and discuss the implications of our research for teaching.