Proposal Title

Analysis of the Effectiveness of Traditional versus Hybrid Student Performance for an Elementary Statistics Course

Proposal Abstract

Hybrid courses are designed to have regular face-to-face time combined with regular online delivery of material and may have up to 50% less classroom meeting time. A recent meta-analysis reported students in online conditions performed modestly better than those learning through traditional face-to-face instruction. Moreover, instruction combining online and face-to-face elements had a larger advantage relative to both purely face-to-face instruction and purely online instruction. We have investigated the performance of students enrolled in traditional versus hybrid elementary statistics courses at our institution. We collected and analyzed student performance data for the course goals over the spring semester of 2011. Discussion of the results of our research involving hybrid statistics courses and suggestions for conducting successful hybrid courses will occur. Statistics is a particularly challenging course, as it has historically been a source of high anxiety levels for students and involves many computational aspects, uses of various types of technologies, and elements of reading comprehension. The audience will be asked to convey possible advantages and disadvantages regarding hybrid course implementation in other disciplines.

Location

Room 2908

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 9th, 10:00 AM Mar 9th, 10:45 AM

Analysis of the Effectiveness of Traditional versus Hybrid Student Performance for an Elementary Statistics Course

Room 2908

Hybrid courses are designed to have regular face-to-face time combined with regular online delivery of material and may have up to 50% less classroom meeting time. A recent meta-analysis reported students in online conditions performed modestly better than those learning through traditional face-to-face instruction. Moreover, instruction combining online and face-to-face elements had a larger advantage relative to both purely face-to-face instruction and purely online instruction. We have investigated the performance of students enrolled in traditional versus hybrid elementary statistics courses at our institution. We collected and analyzed student performance data for the course goals over the spring semester of 2011. Discussion of the results of our research involving hybrid statistics courses and suggestions for conducting successful hybrid courses will occur. Statistics is a particularly challenging course, as it has historically been a source of high anxiety levels for students and involves many computational aspects, uses of various types of technologies, and elements of reading comprehension. The audience will be asked to convey possible advantages and disadvantages regarding hybrid course implementation in other disciplines.