Proposal Abstract

E-texts are seen as the imminent direction for education publishers. There are many e-reader devices currently available, leading to a variety of device characteristics that might affect use of the device, and more importantly, impact behaviors that can influence learning (e.g. note-taking and general likelihood to read). For example, some devices are able to display dynamic, colored images and run applications that allow users to interact with the material, possibly leading to increases in reading and enhanced learning. Less positively, small display screens make the more portable e-reader devices unappealing for many disciplines that rely on large, detailed diagrams (e.g. engineering). However, carrying around a laptop (or being restricted to a desktop computer) makes the reading and learning environment much more restricted than with the smaller and more portable e-reader devices. This presentation shares results of longitudinal data collection investigating student use of various e-reader devices, both in and out of the classroom. Our goals were to better understand overall student use of these devices in order to make more informed recommendations to our administration.

Location

Atrium/Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 8th, 4:00 PM Mar 8th, 5:45 PM

Multiple Case Study Investigation of E-Reader Devices in Academia

Atrium/Concourse

E-texts are seen as the imminent direction for education publishers. There are many e-reader devices currently available, leading to a variety of device characteristics that might affect use of the device, and more importantly, impact behaviors that can influence learning (e.g. note-taking and general likelihood to read). For example, some devices are able to display dynamic, colored images and run applications that allow users to interact with the material, possibly leading to increases in reading and enhanced learning. Less positively, small display screens make the more portable e-reader devices unappealing for many disciplines that rely on large, detailed diagrams (e.g. engineering). However, carrying around a laptop (or being restricted to a desktop computer) makes the reading and learning environment much more restricted than with the smaller and more portable e-reader devices. This presentation shares results of longitudinal data collection investigating student use of various e-reader devices, both in and out of the classroom. Our goals were to better understand overall student use of these devices in order to make more informed recommendations to our administration.