Proposal Abstract

Participants will consider the educational utility of an online social networking site linking diverse populations in a service-learning project, and will discuss opportunities and challenges to reducing stereotypes through such online interaction. The session will begin with a review of findings from a study in which teacher candidates used an online social networking site to connect with Native American high school students in a service-learning project. Course instructors developed the site in response to the candidates' expressed need for greater interaction with these students. We evaluated the educational value of the site through both qualitative and quantitative analysis of candidate reflections and a pre- post-course survey. Attendees will discuss possible interpretations of our data, as well as the following questions: How can diverse partners be effectively linked through online social networking? What learning outcomes might emerge? Is online social networking viewed differently by diverse users? Attendees will then problem-solve ways to improve the learning experience and cross-cultural exchange between teacher candidates and diverse students in an online environment.

Location

Room 2903

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 7th, 3:00 PM Mar 7th, 3:45 PM

Enhancing Cross-Cultural Competencies through Online Social Networking

Room 2903

Participants will consider the educational utility of an online social networking site linking diverse populations in a service-learning project, and will discuss opportunities and challenges to reducing stereotypes through such online interaction. The session will begin with a review of findings from a study in which teacher candidates used an online social networking site to connect with Native American high school students in a service-learning project. Course instructors developed the site in response to the candidates' expressed need for greater interaction with these students. We evaluated the educational value of the site through both qualitative and quantitative analysis of candidate reflections and a pre- post-course survey. Attendees will discuss possible interpretations of our data, as well as the following questions: How can diverse partners be effectively linked through online social networking? What learning outcomes might emerge? Is online social networking viewed differently by diverse users? Attendees will then problem-solve ways to improve the learning experience and cross-cultural exchange between teacher candidates and diverse students in an online environment.