Proposal Title

Impact of Faculty Development Targeting Pedagogical Aspects of Online Teaching

Proposal Abstract

The byproduct of rapidly growing online learning programs is an influx of faculty new to online teaching. While universities typically invest resources in faculty training targeting the content management system and relevant technology, less information is available on the impact of faculty development exclusively focusing on online teaching pedagogy. The current investigation examines the impact of dedicated online pedagogical training (targeting case-based learning, learning communities, faculty-student interactions, classroom management) on student learning, student perceptions and teaching evaluations. Results indicate that students led by faculty who receive pedagogical training (in addition to technology training) showed increased learning and enhanced perceptions surrounding the online learning experience. Contrary to expectations, faculty without pedagogical training were more active in the course; but this increased activity did not result in measured learning gains. Discussion will highlight: key pedagogical strategies that show effectiveness for online learning, strategies for assessing teaching effectiveness in the online classroom and considerations for a comprehensive operationalization of “impact” when examining instructional strategies.

Location

Room 2904

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 7th, 2:00 PM Mar 7th, 2:45 PM

Impact of Faculty Development Targeting Pedagogical Aspects of Online Teaching

Room 2904

The byproduct of rapidly growing online learning programs is an influx of faculty new to online teaching. While universities typically invest resources in faculty training targeting the content management system and relevant technology, less information is available on the impact of faculty development exclusively focusing on online teaching pedagogy. The current investigation examines the impact of dedicated online pedagogical training (targeting case-based learning, learning communities, faculty-student interactions, classroom management) on student learning, student perceptions and teaching evaluations. Results indicate that students led by faculty who receive pedagogical training (in addition to technology training) showed increased learning and enhanced perceptions surrounding the online learning experience. Contrary to expectations, faculty without pedagogical training were more active in the course; but this increased activity did not result in measured learning gains. Discussion will highlight: key pedagogical strategies that show effectiveness for online learning, strategies for assessing teaching effectiveness in the online classroom and considerations for a comprehensive operationalization of “impact” when examining instructional strategies.