Proposal Abstract

Using L. Dee Fink’s model of backward course design for integrated learning (2003), nine members of a year-long faculty learning community (FLC) designed or redesigned a course. Participants initially focused on critically examining what they wanted students to know, do, think and feel ve years after taking their respective classes. Once participants established and re ned course goals, they designed teaching and learning activities and assessments to help students meet those goals. Fink’s model of course design and development provided the framework for creating and implementing these course (re)designs across disciplines. This model integrates the relationships between learning goals, assessment and feedback, and teaching and learning activities to ensure that these components are integrated and support the others. Fink’s conceptual model includes a taxonomy of “signi cant learning” that expands the de nition of what is valued as learning outcomes (for example, those traditionally championed by Bloom) to include goals of foundational knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, caring, and learning how to learn. This poster presents the results of two of the (re)designed courses, one on American literature and one on nutrition education, highlighting the goals of the (re)designed courses with an example of teaching and learning activities, and feedback and assessment that support those learning goals.

Location

Concourse

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

 
Mar 11th, 4:00 PM Mar 11th, 5:15 PM

A Tale of Two Courses: Renovating Courses for Significant Learning

Concourse

Using L. Dee Fink’s model of backward course design for integrated learning (2003), nine members of a year-long faculty learning community (FLC) designed or redesigned a course. Participants initially focused on critically examining what they wanted students to know, do, think and feel ve years after taking their respective classes. Once participants established and re ned course goals, they designed teaching and learning activities and assessments to help students meet those goals. Fink’s model of course design and development provided the framework for creating and implementing these course (re)designs across disciplines. This model integrates the relationships between learning goals, assessment and feedback, and teaching and learning activities to ensure that these components are integrated and support the others. Fink’s conceptual model includes a taxonomy of “signi cant learning” that expands the de nition of what is valued as learning outcomes (for example, those traditionally championed by Bloom) to include goals of foundational knowledge, application, integration, human dimension, caring, and learning how to learn. This poster presents the results of two of the (re)designed courses, one on American literature and one on nutrition education, highlighting the goals of the (re)designed courses with an example of teaching and learning activities, and feedback and assessment that support those learning goals.