Proposal Title

Bridging the Gap from Skills Assessment and Problem-Based Learning: Reflections on Scholarly Engagement with Curriculum Development

Proposal Abstract

This paper charts and reflects on an experience of scholarly engagement with curriculum change, specifically my planning to convert a first year university subject from skill to problem-based learning. The challenge was to develop problem-based curriculum as authentic, equitable and integrated for a large, multi-modal and novice student cohort. The paper presents parallel narratives: a description of curriculum planning; and continuing reflective commentary. The former comprises parallel sub-narratives: immediate curriculum needs; my growing awareness of taken-for-granted assumptions. The latter also comprises parallel themes: my growing understanding of T&L concepts and practices; my increasing awareness of the context of scholarly engagement with T&L. Two closing thoughts have since guided my practice. One: am I realistic in wanting to develop whole-of-unit problem-based learning rather than week-by-week problem-based learning? Two: should I hire a young enthusiastic and skilled educator to assist and mentor me in developing and delivering the new-look subject.

Location

Room 2911

Publication Type and Release Option

Presentation (Open Access)

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Mar 10th, 9:00 AM Mar 10th, 9:45 AM

Bridging the Gap from Skills Assessment and Problem-Based Learning: Reflections on Scholarly Engagement with Curriculum Development

Room 2911

This paper charts and reflects on an experience of scholarly engagement with curriculum change, specifically my planning to convert a first year university subject from skill to problem-based learning. The challenge was to develop problem-based curriculum as authentic, equitable and integrated for a large, multi-modal and novice student cohort. The paper presents parallel narratives: a description of curriculum planning; and continuing reflective commentary. The former comprises parallel sub-narratives: immediate curriculum needs; my growing awareness of taken-for-granted assumptions. The latter also comprises parallel themes: my growing understanding of T&L concepts and practices; my increasing awareness of the context of scholarly engagement with T&L. Two closing thoughts have since guided my practice. One: am I realistic in wanting to develop whole-of-unit problem-based learning rather than week-by-week problem-based learning? Two: should I hire a young enthusiastic and skilled educator to assist and mentor me in developing and delivering the new-look subject.