Presentation Title

PBIS for Parents: Using PBIS Principles at Home

Brief Biography

Shannon Hammond has been a public school educator for 19 years. She has been a 7th and 4th grade teacher, an elementary school counselor, an assistant principal, and is currently a district level administrator. She has coordinated PBIS in two different school systems for a total of six years.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

EdS

Presentation Abstract

Schools implementing PBIS create a set of expectations, teach them to students, and then model them and acknowledge students who meet them. The expectations remain the same for students in all settings at school, including the playground, the classroom, and on the bus. But what about at home? Implementing PBIS at home can help students maintain behavioral expectations.

According to OSEP, schools that have the highest levels of family involvement in the Schoolwide PBIS process are those that have developed action plans for including families and communities in all aspects of the process. Many families of students with disabilities have participated in individual positive behavior support planning; families of students without disabilities are now beginning to participate in individual PBIS planning as well. The article by Laura Riffel entitled “Getting Behavior in Shape at Home”, available on the www.pbis.org website, can be used to assist parents with employing PBIS into their daily routines.

This session will model a presentation that participants can take back and use with parents. The presentation will provide an overview of PBIS in parent-friendly language and then show how to walk parents through development of a PBIS matrix for use at home.

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Dec 4th, 8:30 AM Dec 4th, 9:30 AM

PBIS for Parents: Using PBIS Principles at Home

Student Center-Senate

Schools implementing PBIS create a set of expectations, teach them to students, and then model them and acknowledge students who meet them. The expectations remain the same for students in all settings at school, including the playground, the classroom, and on the bus. But what about at home? Implementing PBIS at home can help students maintain behavioral expectations.

According to OSEP, schools that have the highest levels of family involvement in the Schoolwide PBIS process are those that have developed action plans for including families and communities in all aspects of the process. Many families of students with disabilities have participated in individual positive behavior support planning; families of students without disabilities are now beginning to participate in individual PBIS planning as well. The article by Laura Riffel entitled “Getting Behavior in Shape at Home”, available on the www.pbis.org website, can be used to assist parents with employing PBIS into their daily routines.

This session will model a presentation that participants can take back and use with parents. The presentation will provide an overview of PBIS in parent-friendly language and then show how to walk parents through development of a PBIS matrix for use at home.