Presentation Title

Inclusive Postsecondary Education

Brief Biography

Susanna is the Community Support Specialist for the Center for Leadership in Disability in the School of Public Health at Georgia State University(GSU). DJ is a first year doctoral student in the School Psychology program at GSU.

Highest Degree of Presenter(s)

DJ Roberts- B.A.

Susanna Miller- B.A.

Presentation Abstract

Along with satisfaction and excitement of getting a high school diploma comes the realization of adulthood, of which the future is unclear for most. High school graduates usually have the option to attend college where they can experience a time in which they grow academically, socially, and emotionally. Unfortunately, the option of college is seen as improbable for students with moderate to severe disabilities due to the fact they do not receive regular education diplomas, thus not allowing the learning experiences critical for a successful transition into adulthood.

Inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) is an approach for young adults with moderate to severe disabilities to help provide more positive outcomes within a university or college setting. This inclusion is based on the idea that this experience will lead to a normalizing developmental trajectory and will have positive and lifelong effects. IPSE is important for these reasons: (1) allows for healthy transition into adulthood and the responsibilities that come from that, (2), supports growth academically, and facilitates progressive emotional maturity, (3) provides opportunities to be involved in campus life and to build sustainable peer relationships, and (4) develops career awareness and facilitates employment skills.

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Dec 3rd, 2:00 PM Dec 3rd, 3:00 PM

Inclusive Postsecondary Education

Student Center-Lucerne

Along with satisfaction and excitement of getting a high school diploma comes the realization of adulthood, of which the future is unclear for most. High school graduates usually have the option to attend college where they can experience a time in which they grow academically, socially, and emotionally. Unfortunately, the option of college is seen as improbable for students with moderate to severe disabilities due to the fact they do not receive regular education diplomas, thus not allowing the learning experiences critical for a successful transition into adulthood.

Inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) is an approach for young adults with moderate to severe disabilities to help provide more positive outcomes within a university or college setting. This inclusion is based on the idea that this experience will lead to a normalizing developmental trajectory and will have positive and lifelong effects. IPSE is important for these reasons: (1) allows for healthy transition into adulthood and the responsibilities that come from that, (2), supports growth academically, and facilitates progressive emotional maturity, (3) provides opportunities to be involved in campus life and to build sustainable peer relationships, and (4) develops career awareness and facilitates employment skills.