Term of Award

Spring 2013

Degree Name

Doctor of Education in Education Administration (Ed.D.)

Document Type and Release Option

Dissertation (open access)

Department

Department of Leadership, Technology, and Human Development

Committee Chair

Russell Mays

Committee Member 1

Samuel Hardy

Committee Member 2

Charles B. Hodges

Abstract

Recent research demonstrates the expectation of the use of technology in schools. Advances in technology often require teachers to learn new methods of teaching while trying to keep up with rapidly increasing technological changes. Unfortunately, many teachers report being inadequately prepared to utilize instructional technologies in their classrooms. School leaders have the complex task of providing effective training that meets their teachers’ needs. In this quantitative study, the author sought to determine teachers’ perceptions of professional development activities which result in successful classroom integration of instructional technologies in schools. Teachers from two school districts in Georgia were surveyed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and standard multiple regression. The findings showed that teachers perceive peer support or mentoring and technology personnel support or modeling to be the two most effective forms of professional development activities which result in successful classroom integration of instructional technologies. Non-credit workshops provided by school district or outside consultants was perceived by teachers to be the most ineffective form of professional development for successful classroom integration of instructional technologies. Regression analysis for each of the nine types of professional development was insignificant and therefore indicated that there was not a relationship between a