Session Title

Using GIS to Teach Climate Change in the Science and Agricultural Education Classroom

Session Format

Conference Session (20 minutes)

Location

Room 218/220

Abstract for the conference program

This study used a mixed methods research design to explore the use of GIS to teach climate change. The work consisted of two parts: 1) teacher training, and 2) classroom implementation. Student-, teacher-, and classroom-centered data were collected to address student outcomes, teacher perceptions of GIS use in teaching climate change, and both students’ and teachers’ perceptions of challenges and successes of using GIS in the classroom. Students showed an overall positive growth in knowledge. Teachers shared a positive perception, going so far as to report that they will all continue to teach climate change and use GIS in their classrooms. Successes and challenges were observed in classrooms, recognizing the benefits of student engagement and learning, as well as the challenges of using technology and supporting student needs. This exploratory research supports the premise that using a GIS to teach climate change is practical, reproducible, and effective.

Proposal Track

Research Project

Start Date

3-3-2017 10:45 AM

End Date

3-3-2017 11:15 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 3rd, 10:45 AM Mar 3rd, 11:15 AM

Using GIS to Teach Climate Change in the Science and Agricultural Education Classroom

Room 218/220

This study used a mixed methods research design to explore the use of GIS to teach climate change. The work consisted of two parts: 1) teacher training, and 2) classroom implementation. Student-, teacher-, and classroom-centered data were collected to address student outcomes, teacher perceptions of GIS use in teaching climate change, and both students’ and teachers’ perceptions of challenges and successes of using GIS in the classroom. Students showed an overall positive growth in knowledge. Teachers shared a positive perception, going so far as to report that they will all continue to teach climate change and use GIS in their classrooms. Successes and challenges were observed in classrooms, recognizing the benefits of student engagement and learning, as well as the challenges of using technology and supporting student needs. This exploratory research supports the premise that using a GIS to teach climate change is practical, reproducible, and effective.