Presentation Title

Older Adults with Intellectual Disability

Type of Presentation

Poster

Location

Ballroom

Start Date

10-13-2017 1:00 PM

End Date

10-13-2017 1:50 PM

Abstract

Older adults (OA) have mental health care needs that are unique to any other age group, and this is especially true for those who also have an intellectual disability (ID). A literature review was completed to explore these unique needs, as well as evidence-based treatment options, multicultural considerations, and ethical implications for mental health care of this population. Individuals with an ID are more likely to develop chronic medical problems such as cardiovascular disease and obesity, which in turn are associated with greater prevalence of psychological illnesses such as dementia, depression, and anxiety (Evenhuis et al., 2001). Diagnosis of dementia in this population is difficult due to an overlap of symptoms, and there is a disparity in dementia screenings between OAs with and without an ID (Axmon, Karlsson, & Ahlstrom, 2016). Traditionally, behavioral interventions have been the primary treatment option. However, cognitive behavioral therapy has been found to significantly reduce depressive symptoms among individuals with an ID (Unwin et al., 2016). Rural OAs with an ID face obstacles in availability of care as rural areas tend to have fewer formal mental health resources available, and OAs with an ID are less likely to have children of their own to rely on for informal caregiving (Acquilano, Davidson, & Janicki, 2007). Mental health professionals should continuously monitor for abuse and neglect, be thorough in considering assessment and treatment needs, and be aware of who can provide informed consent for treatment.

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Oct 13th, 1:00 PM Oct 13th, 1:50 PM

Older Adults with Intellectual Disability

Ballroom

Older adults (OA) have mental health care needs that are unique to any other age group, and this is especially true for those who also have an intellectual disability (ID). A literature review was completed to explore these unique needs, as well as evidence-based treatment options, multicultural considerations, and ethical implications for mental health care of this population. Individuals with an ID are more likely to develop chronic medical problems such as cardiovascular disease and obesity, which in turn are associated with greater prevalence of psychological illnesses such as dementia, depression, and anxiety (Evenhuis et al., 2001). Diagnosis of dementia in this population is difficult due to an overlap of symptoms, and there is a disparity in dementia screenings between OAs with and without an ID (Axmon, Karlsson, & Ahlstrom, 2016). Traditionally, behavioral interventions have been the primary treatment option. However, cognitive behavioral therapy has been found to significantly reduce depressive symptoms among individuals with an ID (Unwin et al., 2016). Rural OAs with an ID face obstacles in availability of care as rural areas tend to have fewer formal mental health resources available, and OAs with an ID are less likely to have children of their own to rely on for informal caregiving (Acquilano, Davidson, & Janicki, 2007). Mental health professionals should continuously monitor for abuse and neglect, be thorough in considering assessment and treatment needs, and be aware of who can provide informed consent for treatment.