Title

Class Meets Literature: The Author of "Cuarto oscuro" Comes to Visit

Subject Area

Hispanic Women Writers

Abstract

"Cuarto oscuro: Recuerdos en blanco y negro" is an autobiographical graphic novel by Argentine-American author Lila Quintero Weaver. The work touches on themes as varied as family, immigration, cultural adaptation, segregation, and the civil rights movement, as the author was an eye witness to life as an outsider in rural Alabama from 1961 forward. In the fall of 2019, Ms. Weaver visited Valdosta State University and spoke to the class in the course on Spanish Culture, Conversation and Composition. Her proximity to both the location and the experiences of students presented a unique opportunity to combine Hispanic literature of the U.S., contemporary literary genres, contemporary topics, and the immigrant perspective. A description of the work, the author’s visit, and student reactions will be presented.

Brief Bio Note

Fleming Bell is an assistant professor of Spanish at Valdosta State University in Valdosta, Georgia, where he teaches beginning and intermediate-level Spanish courses, and a graduate-level ESOL course.

Keywords

Argentina, Alabama, immigration, cultural adaptation, segregation, civil rights, women writers, Hispanic literature of the United States, graphic novel, autobiography

Presentation Year

October 2020

Start Date

10-23-2020 11:10 AM

End Date

10-23-2020 11:50 AM

Embargo

12-16-2019

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Oct 23rd, 11:10 AM Oct 23rd, 11:50 AM

Class Meets Literature: The Author of "Cuarto oscuro" Comes to Visit

"Cuarto oscuro: Recuerdos en blanco y negro" is an autobiographical graphic novel by Argentine-American author Lila Quintero Weaver. The work touches on themes as varied as family, immigration, cultural adaptation, segregation, and the civil rights movement, as the author was an eye witness to life as an outsider in rural Alabama from 1961 forward. In the fall of 2019, Ms. Weaver visited Valdosta State University and spoke to the class in the course on Spanish Culture, Conversation and Composition. Her proximity to both the location and the experiences of students presented a unique opportunity to combine Hispanic literature of the U.S., contemporary literary genres, contemporary topics, and the immigrant perspective. A description of the work, the author’s visit, and student reactions will be presented.