Title

#MeToo Multimedia Poetry: An Evolution of Argentine Female Empowerment in the Digital Era

Subject Area

Hispanic Women Writers

Abstract

This presentation traces a progressive path of Argentine female subjectivity as mapped on a digital archive of poetic feminist emancipation and shared resistance. The exploration centers on the first-person lyrical manifestos and subsequent e-fan response surrounding three representative poets: Alfonsina Storni (1892-1938), Ana María Uribe (1944-2004), and Tálata Rodríguez (b. 1978). This investigation proposes an analysis of the paradigmatic gender shift occurring when the female speaker liberates herself from the two-dimensional confines of inked words on flat pages—a literary space under patriarchal control—and ventures through the sensorial punch of cinematography and instantaneous mass distribution into the augmented reality of multimedia text creation and global Grrrl-power creative she-horts—a fourth-wave #NiUnaMenos landscape where a collective subject transcends gender inequality. The journey commences with “Voy a dormir. . .,” Storni’s haunting farewell poem, one she postmarked to the country’s leading newspaper, La Nación, before making her bold final declaration of voluntary euthanasia. Second stop on the pilgrimage is the 1997 electronically animated poetry known as anipoemas produced by Uribe. Her concrete e-poetry uses sound effects and visual movement in a Huidobrian creacionista manner but with a queer twist. The host for the final destination is LatinX influencer Tálata Rodríguez, a self-tagged cultural activist known for Youtube video-poems and a popular TedX Río de la Plata talk, in which she asserts, “Pueden decir que soy una soñadora, pero no soy la única,” thus encapsulating the solidarity this essay presents as the prototype for multimedia poetic creation in the #MeToo era.

Brief Bio Note

An Associate Professor of Spanish at Auburn University, she specializes in contemporary Spanish American/LatinX poetry. She is also a creative writer and literary translator. Her current scholarship focuses on queer expression, transcreation, Costa Rica;s Ediciones Perro Azul poets, Julia Alvarez’s intersectional poetry, and zoesía, the poetic philosophy of Zoé Valdés.

Keywords

Argentina, feminism, poetry, multimedia, Alfonsina Storni, Ana María Uribe, Tálata Rodríguez

Presentation Year

October 2020

Start Date

10-22-2020 3:45 PM

End Date

10-22-2020 4:25 PM

Embargo

10-14-2019

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Oct 22nd, 3:45 PM Oct 22nd, 4:25 PM

#MeToo Multimedia Poetry: An Evolution of Argentine Female Empowerment in the Digital Era

This presentation traces a progressive path of Argentine female subjectivity as mapped on a digital archive of poetic feminist emancipation and shared resistance. The exploration centers on the first-person lyrical manifestos and subsequent e-fan response surrounding three representative poets: Alfonsina Storni (1892-1938), Ana María Uribe (1944-2004), and Tálata Rodríguez (b. 1978). This investigation proposes an analysis of the paradigmatic gender shift occurring when the female speaker liberates herself from the two-dimensional confines of inked words on flat pages—a literary space under patriarchal control—and ventures through the sensorial punch of cinematography and instantaneous mass distribution into the augmented reality of multimedia text creation and global Grrrl-power creative she-horts—a fourth-wave #NiUnaMenos landscape where a collective subject transcends gender inequality. The journey commences with “Voy a dormir. . .,” Storni’s haunting farewell poem, one she postmarked to the country’s leading newspaper, La Nación, before making her bold final declaration of voluntary euthanasia. Second stop on the pilgrimage is the 1997 electronically animated poetry known as anipoemas produced by Uribe. Her concrete e-poetry uses sound effects and visual movement in a Huidobrian creacionista manner but with a queer twist. The host for the final destination is LatinX influencer Tálata Rodríguez, a self-tagged cultural activist known for Youtube video-poems and a popular TedX Río de la Plata talk, in which she asserts, “Pueden decir que soy una soñadora, pero no soy la única,” thus encapsulating the solidarity this essay presents as the prototype for multimedia poetic creation in the #MeToo era.