Title

SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI’S “CANTICLE OF THE SUN.” THE BEGINNING OF ITALIAN LITERATURE AND THE SACRALITY OF NATURE AND THE MEDIEVAL BIRTH OF THE MODERN ECOLOGICAL CULTURE.

Titles of the Individual Presentations in a Panel

Dr. Maria G. Simonelli Monmouth University Department of Foreign Language Studies Plangere Center, Room 124 West Long Branch, N.J. 07764 msimonel@monmouth.edu Tel. (732) 263-5612

Subject Area

Literary Criticism

Abstract

St. Francis of Assisi’s Canticle of the Sun, is the first major work of the Italian Literature. This paper highlights the literary value of the Canticle. Furthermore, it shows the foresight of St. Francis who with his Canticle enhanced and safeguarded the four elements in times when there was no pollution and the work of man ended up being paid off by the natural cycle. This was recognized by Pope John Paul II who, with his April 6, 1980 papal bull, declared St. Francis of Assisi patron of ecology.

Brief Bio Note

Dr. Maria G. Simonelli 1978 PhD. in Italian Literature and Philosophy Università di Napoli Italy since 1995 professor of Italian, Latin and Classical Greek at Monmouth University Department of Foreign Language Studies Plangere Center, Room 124 West Long Branch, N.J. 07764 and Coordinator of the Italian Program

Keywords

Echology, Literature, Italian, Poetry, St. Francis, Modernity

Presentation Year

October 2020

Start Date

10-22-2020 2:55 PM

End Date

10-22-2020 3:35 PM

Embargo

11-6-2019

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Oct 22nd, 2:55 PM Oct 22nd, 3:35 PM

SAINT FRANCIS OF ASSISI’S “CANTICLE OF THE SUN.” THE BEGINNING OF ITALIAN LITERATURE AND THE SACRALITY OF NATURE AND THE MEDIEVAL BIRTH OF THE MODERN ECOLOGICAL CULTURE.

St. Francis of Assisi’s Canticle of the Sun, is the first major work of the Italian Literature. This paper highlights the literary value of the Canticle. Furthermore, it shows the foresight of St. Francis who with his Canticle enhanced and safeguarded the four elements in times when there was no pollution and the work of man ended up being paid off by the natural cycle. This was recognized by Pope John Paul II who, with his April 6, 1980 papal bull, declared St. Francis of Assisi patron of ecology.