Title

"One Day at a Time": Rewriting the Cuban-American Experience the Netflix Way

Titles of the Individual Presentations in a Panel

H.J. Manzari

Subject Area

Hispanic Caribbean Studies

Abstract

Norman Lear's rewrite of the sitcom One Day at a Time brings to light the the Cuban-American experience in a 21st century script. Cuban-American identity is questioned, challenged and celebrated in an onscreen way as NETFLIX dominates this ethnographic project. Understanding the performance of social identity in this contemporary sitcom, within a variety of contexts is powerfully elucidated when linked to aesthetic re-presentations of reality in a narrative text or on in front of a live audience, with all the issues of representation that that entails. What particularly compels our interest when we think about Cuban American identity in the context of the displaced Caribbean, helps us better understand the link between power, history and the development of diasporic identity through communicative practices and processes of visual cultural production.

Brief Bio Note

H.J. Manzari Associate Professor of Spanish Washington & Jefferson College Director of Latin American Studies Founder and Director of Voces del Caribe: The Online Journal of Caribbean Studies http://vocesdelcaribe.org Spanish Program Director

Keywords

Caribbean/Cuban-American

Presentation Year

October 2020

Start Date

10-22-2020 2:05 PM

End Date

10-22-2020 2:45 PM

Embargo

8-21-2020

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Oct 22nd, 2:05 PM Oct 22nd, 2:45 PM

"One Day at a Time": Rewriting the Cuban-American Experience the Netflix Way

Norman Lear's rewrite of the sitcom One Day at a Time brings to light the the Cuban-American experience in a 21st century script. Cuban-American identity is questioned, challenged and celebrated in an onscreen way as NETFLIX dominates this ethnographic project. Understanding the performance of social identity in this contemporary sitcom, within a variety of contexts is powerfully elucidated when linked to aesthetic re-presentations of reality in a narrative text or on in front of a live audience, with all the issues of representation that that entails. What particularly compels our interest when we think about Cuban American identity in the context of the displaced Caribbean, helps us better understand the link between power, history and the development of diasporic identity through communicative practices and processes of visual cultural production.