Title

(Afro)Latinos in Social Media, Music and Television

Titles of the Individual Presentations in a Panel

(Mis)Representation of (Afro)Latinos in Television - Dominque Lott Disassembling Cultural and Political Symbols in "Latinoamérica" by Calle 13 - Kathryn Thompson From “La Bamba" to Plena and Folklorization of Traditions in “Despacito”- Lukasz Pawelek

Subject Area

Afro-Hispanic Studies

Abstract

Over the past two and a half decades, several musical genres have surpassed their Caribbean roots and achieved worldwide fame and recognition. Dancehall music and Reggaeton had been increasingly connected to diasporic cultural signifier as they stir away from afro-Caribbean and native cultural symbols and elements. Despacito, the 2017 chart breaker Reggaeton hit become intensely popular as global commodities, particularly web-based streaming platforms (e.g. YouTube, Spotifier, Instagram) proliferate its global audiovisual mobility and reception. This article examines the representation of cultural symbols, urban spaces and globalization within the world’s most played Spanish language song of all times, “Despacito”. Furthermore, the study explores folklorization of (Afro)Latino culture, transnational consumption and representations of territorial identity articulated in La Bamba, Plena and Puerto Rican street poetry. In addition, the panel investigates historical and cultural symbols and signifiers in “Latinoamérica” by Puerto Rican alternative music band from La Perla, Calle 13.Moreover, the panel investigates (mis)representation of Afro-Latinos in television: CW series Jane the Virgen, Columbian drama series La Nina, and Lifetime series Devious Maids. Theoretically, the presentations combine the fields of ethnomusicology and (Afro)Latino/a studies and are supported by Juan Flores (2001), Rivera-Rideay (2013), Rodriguez (2010) and Marshal (2017).

Brief Bio Note

Lukasz Pawelek, (Ph.D. Wayne State University) is an Assistant Professor of Spanish and German in the Department of Humanities at University of South Carolina Beaufort. His research interests encompass U.S. Latino and diasporic literature, literary representations of nostalgia, collective memory and globalization, and the evolving Latinx identity in the United States; secondary field of interested: Post-Wall Ostalgie memoir and film.

Keywords

Globalization, (Afro)Latino, media, pop music and culture, folklorization of traditions.

Location

Morning Session 1 (PARB 239)

Presentation Year

2019

Start Date

4-11-2019 9:15 AM

End Date

4-11-2019 10:30 AM

Embargo

11-12-2018

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Apr 11th, 9:15 AM Apr 11th, 10:30 AM

(Afro)Latinos in Social Media, Music and Television

Morning Session 1 (PARB 239)

Over the past two and a half decades, several musical genres have surpassed their Caribbean roots and achieved worldwide fame and recognition. Dancehall music and Reggaeton had been increasingly connected to diasporic cultural signifier as they stir away from afro-Caribbean and native cultural symbols and elements. Despacito, the 2017 chart breaker Reggaeton hit become intensely popular as global commodities, particularly web-based streaming platforms (e.g. YouTube, Spotifier, Instagram) proliferate its global audiovisual mobility and reception. This article examines the representation of cultural symbols, urban spaces and globalization within the world’s most played Spanish language song of all times, “Despacito”. Furthermore, the study explores folklorization of (Afro)Latino culture, transnational consumption and representations of territorial identity articulated in La Bamba, Plena and Puerto Rican street poetry. In addition, the panel investigates historical and cultural symbols and signifiers in “Latinoamérica” by Puerto Rican alternative music band from La Perla, Calle 13.Moreover, the panel investigates (mis)representation of Afro-Latinos in television: CW series Jane the Virgen, Columbian drama series La Nina, and Lifetime series Devious Maids. Theoretically, the presentations combine the fields of ethnomusicology and (Afro)Latino/a studies and are supported by Juan Flores (2001), Rivera-Rideay (2013), Rodriguez (2010) and Marshal (2017).