Title

The Neapolitan Soul and Romantic Heart of the World

Subject Area

Literary Criticism

Abstract

Abstract

Since the poetry of Virgil (Aeneid) to Torquato Tasso (La Gerusalemme liberata), from the theatre of De Filippo (Natale in casa Cupiello) to the poetry of Salvatore Di Giacomo (Pianefforte’ e notte) to Antonio De Curtis (A livella), the literature, poetry, lyric and music of Naples has expressed the soul and heart of the World. Ernesto De Curtis (1875-1937) was in New York City, when he composed the song “Torna a Surriento, Come back to Sorrento.” That was the locality, in the gulf of Naples, where he and his wife Amalia spent their honeymoon. It was not only a return to natural beauty, but also to the place that harbored the Greek and Roman culture. Ernesto was in New York when Enrico Caruso and Beniamino Gigli were exporting the “Bel Canto” at the New York Metropolitan Opera House.

Brief Bio Note

PhD Philosophy, History Italian University of Naples Italy 1978

Current Professor of Italian and Latin at Monmouth University

West Long Branch NJ 07764

Keywords

Poetry Literature Italian Lyrics Music Romanticism

Location

Afternoon Session 3 (PARB 239)

Presentation Year

April 2019

Start Date

4-12-2019 5:15 PM

Embargo

11-16-2018

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Apr 12th, 5:15 PM

The Neapolitan Soul and Romantic Heart of the World

Afternoon Session 3 (PARB 239)

Abstract

Since the poetry of Virgil (Aeneid) to Torquato Tasso (La Gerusalemme liberata), from the theatre of De Filippo (Natale in casa Cupiello) to the poetry of Salvatore Di Giacomo (Pianefforte’ e notte) to Antonio De Curtis (A livella), the literature, poetry, lyric and music of Naples has expressed the soul and heart of the World. Ernesto De Curtis (1875-1937) was in New York City, when he composed the song “Torna a Surriento, Come back to Sorrento.” That was the locality, in the gulf of Naples, where he and his wife Amalia spent their honeymoon. It was not only a return to natural beauty, but also to the place that harbored the Greek and Roman culture. Ernesto was in New York when Enrico Caruso and Beniamino Gigli were exporting the “Bel Canto” at the New York Metropolitan Opera House.