Title

The Morisco Episodes of Don Quijote (II 54, 63-65) and Contemporary Political Discourse on Immigration: A Comparative Analysis

Subject Area

Spanish Peninsular Studies

Abstract

This study draws a comparison between the political discourse surrounding the Moriscos as portrayed in Part II of Don Quijote (1615) and the political discourse of President Trump concerning immigration in the United States. The generalization of a group of people in literary and political discourse essentially creates an oppositional binary that dehumanizes them. This strategy was used to expel the Moriscos from Spain beginning in 1609 and President Trump is using it today to classify immigrants as deviants. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the importance of literary studies and cultural theory (Foucault, Said, and others) as they relate to contemporary events.

Brief Bio Note

Dr. Groundland is an Associate Professor at Tennessee Tech University where he teaches Spanish language, culture, and literature.

Keywords

Cervantes, Quijote, Moriscos, Immigration

Location

Afternoon Session 1 (PARB 227)

Presentation Year

April 2019

Start Date

4-12-2019 2:15 PM

Embargo

12-14-2018

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Apr 12th, 2:15 PM

The Morisco Episodes of Don Quijote (II 54, 63-65) and Contemporary Political Discourse on Immigration: A Comparative Analysis

Afternoon Session 1 (PARB 227)

This study draws a comparison between the political discourse surrounding the Moriscos as portrayed in Part II of Don Quijote (1615) and the political discourse of President Trump concerning immigration in the United States. The generalization of a group of people in literary and political discourse essentially creates an oppositional binary that dehumanizes them. This strategy was used to expel the Moriscos from Spain beginning in 1609 and President Trump is using it today to classify immigrants as deviants. The aim of this paper is to illuminate the importance of literary studies and cultural theory (Foucault, Said, and others) as they relate to contemporary events.